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overwintering figs

 
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
78
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I just got a small fig tree today and I'm thinking about how to overwinter it here in zone 5b. I know some people pack mulch around it with tarpaper or something, and some people dig a ranch and bury it every winter. Other people just grow them in pots and put them in a cool place for the winter.

There ideas all seem less than optimal for me. A lot of work an it seems hard on the trees.Does anyone grow figs in my climate? Does anyone have tips or advice?
 
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Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
68
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My only tip is to dry out the site as much as possible, as in, dont water anymore. Figs hold a lot of water in their branches, and I have seen the branches literally burst like a copper pipe. Fig trees do have a lot of vigor though, so even when that has happened, the tree just resprouts lower down and continues growing the next year.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
78
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I'm guessing that a warm microclimate would be good. I wonder if large stones would help.
 
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