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green cheap insulation

 
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I am insulating a 14x14 A-frame tiny house on tiny budget. Ideas for green insulation that is super cheap. It is in Oregon, and it rarely gets super cold, but it does on occasion. It will be heated with wood, so I want to be efficient. Any ideas appreciated.
 
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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We use a waste product: wood shavings from local lumber mills and carpentry workshops. But our houses are earthen and heated by the sun so there is little risk of fire. It might not be suitable for a frame house heated with wood!
 
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Location: Asheville NC
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Cellulose is widely seen as the greenest insulation choice for most green building professionals. Its mainly recycled newspaper and its very affordable and available. I think most folks in the Pacific Northwest prefer blown fiberglass for moisture concerns but cellulose should be fine if you do a good job on your exterior cladding and flashing.
 
Brian Knight
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Oh how could I forget! Air sealing is the most cost-effective strategy for weatherization. Focus on creating a tight envelope first, and then worry about insulation.

R value is important, but continuous insulation is usually more important than the amount of R in the cavities. In other words, a continuous blanket of mineral wool or recycled foam board on the outside of the structural members can have a much bigger impact than the insulation levels inside the wall cavities. In other, other words, a well placed (continuous, exterior) R5 is more effective than a poorly placed R12.
 
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Nothing beats wool of the sheep's back. Don't buy it yards of skein but daggy wool from the shearing shed and wash it. Best insulator hot and cold plus fireproof, no irritant, and completely natural.
 
He does not suffer fools gladly. But this tiny ad does:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
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