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tiny house wood stove, tiny budget  RSS feed

 
Daphne Singingtree
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We are building at tiny house, a 14x14 A-frame, with a very tiny budget, looking for low cost wood stove options for heating. Everything I have looked at so far is too expensive, don't have the time or knowledge to build anything. Suggestions?
Thanks.
 
Su Ba
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Posts: 979
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Your profile doesn't indicate where you are located, so I don't know how much serious heat you need. There are small steel box stoves popular in Alaska for heating hunting tents. There are even smaller ones used for icefishing. Not very expensive. But it all depends upon how much heat and how long of a fire duration you are looking for. Also, depending upon your area, you might be able to find a used stove via Craigslist or notices put up on local bulletin boards.

One of our friends bought an old coal house heater out of an abandoned house. Tracked down the owner via the property tax records and got the rusted pile of iron for almost nothing. Scraped the rust away, put new gaskets and furnace cement on it, plus replaced a cracked fire brick. Attached it to new stove pipe and it worked just fine. Not pretty to look at, for real. But it heated his house for several years until he could afford something nicer.

...Su Ba
www.kaufarmer.blogspot.com
 
R Scott
Posts: 3351
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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If you give your location and a little more info, it would be helpful.

Here is a cheap ready-made woodstove: http://vogelzang.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=59_95&product_id=113

and here is some of the best cabin/tent stoves, actually better than the above: http://fourdog.com/view-all-tent-stoves

You also could do one of these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00APJQNES/ref=wl_it_dp_v_nS_img?_encoding=UTF8&colid=U8Z6BPC2IP24&coliid=I2D1D72WF77QCD
 
Daphne Singingtree
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We are in Eugene, Oregon, does not get too cold, just damp. I have been checking Craigslist with no luck. I saw a nice stove the Kimberly stove, that would cost more than the whole house.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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http://www.marinestove.com/sardineinfo.htm

You can get small, but you have to pay dearly for it...

On a budget: http://www.ammocanstove.com/

If it were me: I would plan for an RMH and figure out where your roof penetration will be. Do the roof penetration for the RMH, and then put one of these budget cookstoves in place for this year. Build the RMH next summer and move the woodstove to an outdoor kitchen.
 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Dauphene Singingtree : Because of your late start, R. Scotts advice to you is very good. It does require that when you look at a rocket mass heater, and the Thermal Mass
Bench that you see a beautiful piece of built-in furniture that you WANT in the very center of your home, other wise pass on it too!

If you want your own personal house dragon which is great company, you will want to prepare the floor area for your Rocket and Mass Bench, as you are building the house
foundation, the simplest way to go is an insulated box over compacted/tamped ground , some crushed stone and about 4 '' of concrete on which you will lay up your rockets
insulated base ( this time the insulation is to protect your concrete from HEAT damage) !

Failing to plan this step, this year, can turn a simple installation into a nightmare, or even make it impossible without picking up your house and moving it ! A foundation for
any wood stove, and its chimney should be as important as remembering to bring water in and preparing drains for grey water ! Good luck and I hope this was timely and
helped ! For the Good of The Crafts !

Think like Fire, Flow like a Gas, Don't be the Marshmallow ! As always, your comments and questions are all solicited and are Welcome ! PYRO - Logically BIG AL !
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Failing to plan this step, this year, can turn a simple installation into a nightmare, or even make it impossible without picking up your house and moving it ! A foundation for any wood stove, and its chimney should be as important as remembering to bring water in and preparing drains for grey water !


I learned this the hard way. Which reminds me of another critical thing:

MINIMUM CLEARANCE TO COMBUSTIBLES!!! Cheap wood stoves often need THREE FEET of clearance on all sides to any wood structure. That is a big chunk of a 14x14 house. Even with heat shields you would be dedicating a lot of your space for a cheap heater...
 
Daphne Singingtree
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Great suggestions. I like the blue ridge stove, it will work for our space in the budget. I also appreciate the suggestions of folks to look at other designs as we are building, so as to not need to retrofit.
Thanks, all
 
Michael Schuiling
Posts: 4
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DO NOT USE A Voglezang stove in a 14X14 combustible material area! I mean no disrespect to anyone! Voglezang makes a very inexpensive stove. However, they require large clearance areas because of their design. They will heat like the sun, because they are inefficient. But, they have a tendency to "run away" from an overfire. If they run away, it is nearly impossible to choke them down and keep the heat in a safe range.

I know this post may upset some. But, I have spent a great deal of my life working on these stoves. I have a NFPA certification and I am not making this up.

Don't skimp here. Get good quality stoves to heat small areas. Carbon monoxide is a serious issue in small areas.

Hope this helps.

Frostymedic
 
Bethany Dutch
Posts: 208
Location: Colville, WA Zone 5b
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We're building a small place right now - 720 sq feet for family of 5 - and if I had the TIME to learn how to do it properly I would have planned on a RMH. I think RMH is by far the best way to go, especially if you harvest your own wood. As it stands now, I was able to get a small ish stove for $230 off craigslist which worked out really well. I only had to replace the rope gasket and repolish it, and I'm test burning it right now and it's working really really nicely.

Now - if you are looking on CL, make sure you post a WANTED ad also. Lots of people have them around but don't really take the time to post an ad of what they have available
 
jack vegas
Posts: 17
Location: Edge of the World - PNW
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Wow. 200 square feet with two people in it. I assume two since you said "we". Sounds to me that if your place is well insulated your body heat alone would keep the place warm! Seriously. Living full time on the north coast of Washington, we have a similar climate to Eugene and live in a 750 square foot cabin. We spent the first year re-insulating, sealing, and upgrading windows. Now, between my wife and I and two large Newfoundland dogs, the place barely needs any heat, even when temperatures are in the 20s outside. We had a similar desire to heat with wood but could never find a small enough stove. The house had electric heat when we bought it and it turned out that on our coldest days we only used about 1 kw per hour to keep the house above 65 deg F. That's the equivalent of burning less than 1/2 lb/hr of wood.

We gave up on wood heat and now carefully schedule cooking to help heat the house. Baking in the morning and dinner in the evening keeps things warm more or less. On really cold days or when we want to drive away the damp, we use a small propane heater that cost less than $100. It is a Mr Heater "Little Buddy" that costs about $70 right now on Amazon. It puts out about 3,800 Btu which is probably all you will need. We also have a small propane stove and oven for cooking and frankly, we use more propane for cooking than we do for heating. Think insulation. If that fails, get a big dog!
 
hisako nora
Posts: 14
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myself and my partner live in a small school bus 7x14. . we bought a stove from this guy http://fourdog.com/
the stove came highly recommended from hiker friends who use this as a camp stove, its totally airtight
thick metal, well made, very light (like 40 lbs)
the problem is that it comes stock with a 5 inch flue. . this is not standard size as far as I can tell and it took us a minute to find the 5'' -6'' adaptor

cheers
john
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1091
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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Our family of five built a tiny house back before we knew what tiny houses were - it was simply what we could get done in the two months with the $5K we had in hand. Our cottage is 252 sq-ft and we've been in it for seven years now. We love it. It only takes 0.75 cord of wood a year to heat. I had never heard of a rocket mass heater back then but that is basically what I built. It is constructed right into the structure of the center of our building. While our house is tiny, it has a large mass. It is about 100,000 lbs of masonry inside an insulating envelope. The high thermal mass stores heat very well. Since moving in we've spent about $2K more so our total spending to date is about $7K on our house. Now we're building a butcher shop. Again tiny but bigger than our house. By the way, we're in the mountains of northern Vermont - it stays cold here four about six months a year. See pictures at: http://SugarMtnFarm.com/cottage

Cheers,

-Walter
 
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