• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

beautifying a mobile home. ideas?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 171
Location: western n.c.
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey, title is pretty self explanatory haha. Here's the background though. We had started the foundation of our dream home a few years ago, but decided to hold off on it and build our farm first. We have a super nice commercial scale organic berry farm now, but it will be several more years until we are able to generate the income we need to re-start our home and even then it will be a very optimistic 5 years to complete it. I am VERY tired of this old trailer, I bought it a long time ago and it has served me well, but I'm tired of seeing "a trailer"... My other issue is that within 2 years we will have our full setup for a teaching farm and will be hosting workshops here quite often, our location is prime for this and we are very lucky. I do not think people will appreciate showing up to take a class in the backyard of a "trailer" though, so I've been thinking of ways to help it out a bit. This is an old trailer with the metal siding and 2x3 wall studs. I have already done a fantastic job on the inside turning it into a more of a house look than a trailer look, so now I have to focus on the outside over the winter when the farm work is a little less of a concern.

I am pretty sure that I can do a board and batten type siding on this to make it look more like a rustic little cabin, it already has a new metal roof on it over the old trailer roof. I can usually get rough sawn lumber pretty cheap so I think this may be the most affordable way to accomplish the look I'm after, cost is a major factor here. Right now, I am feeling that board and batten as well as making window frames and some trim will make it look a little more "homey" and even if someone is sly enough to figure out what we did, they might appreciate it a bit.

My mother and father and stepfather are all 3 building contractors, so I have been raised in construction, no job is too much as long as the COST is kept down, we're still dumping everything we can into the farm
 
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
116
bee books chicken duck goat trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm thinking of materials that you can repurpose later, for example if you plan to roof a porch on the dream house with corrugated tin roofing, use that now to beautify.
Much can be done with trellising and foundation planting that conceal the trailer-ness of the foundation at least during the busy months.. Can't do much for the roof pitch, except go high with a trellis and distract the view.
Just curious. How are you planning to deal with the trailer when you build the dream house? Our neighbors are in a similar situation, living in a pink monstrosity. They can't wait to see it gone, but I have not dared ask them (self-styled ecowarriors) exactly how they plan to get rid of it in a responsible way. We have a small travel trailer that I fear is here for the duration. It may become a chicken coop, if it sits around much longer.
 
steward
Posts: 4400
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
262
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
M, if you can get rough lumber cheap, then that sounds like a good plan to me.
 
                    
Posts: 238
Location: AR ~ozark mountain range~zone7a
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A neatly done rock job to enclose the underside works pretty well 'anchoring the whole exterior look as a permanent house' perhaps brownish red stained western cedar batten siding would give the ranch look. Yellow and white trimmed siding is bright & cheery. Is your roof colored or silver? A big porch or deck always seems useful, screened in makes it more useful, a little style can be built into the railings arrangement, maybe one of those $700 metal 2 car carports could be useful...if the carport roof metal is same color as the house roof color! Big shrubs, Elephant Ears, cannas, azaleas...something you like, maybe just some ferns. Window planter boxes might help especially if your putting on some sturdy new siding. Change the mobile home porch lites! LOL

james beam.

 
M Foti
Posts: 171
Location: western n.c.
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thanks for the ideas so far. Sadly in our state there is NO way to get rid of or re-purpose a mobile home that is this old, if it is ever moved from it's foundation it cannot be used again legally. Obviously recycling of the metals would be done, and the rest would end up in a landfill, however I am open to other purposes for 20 year old fiberglass insulation and drywall...

I do have big screened in porches, one is a very nice outdoor kitchen. We have made the most out of this place, but that's not saying much haha. I still feel like we made the best choice of putting money into our farm before our house, but it's hard coming home everyday and seeing this place as well as it will be impossible to make money hosting workshops here until the trailer doesn't look like a trailer anymore

I like the idea of the rock, and I may have enough around to do that with, this thing is pretty high off the ground though, one end you can barely crawl under and the other end you can walk under without ducking. It is underpinned but just with the same corrugated metal we built the new roof out of.

I still think we're going with the board and batten siding idea, unless I can find live edge material cheaper. We have quite a few sawmills around here, so I think it'll be affordable either way. I am very tempted to add on a room or two to break up the lines a bit, that may end up happening, but I feel like that is a dangerous proposition for me haha, I'd rather stay slightly uncomfortable in here thereby guaranteeing my building of a real house as soon as finances permit


 
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been contemplating the same thing here in FL. I'm currently unemployed and not able to build the ICF home I want... so mobile home for now.

I'd also contemplated some type of iron frame structure and corrugated sheet metal over that to to protect from our occasional hurricane.
 
No prison can hold Chairface Chippendale. And on a totally different topic ... my stuff:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!