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Question on Horse Manure

 
Jose Reymondez
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Location: Galicia, Spain Zone 9
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So I have a heavy clay and I'm looking to bring in as much organic material as possible.

The best deals I find around me are for horse manure. For example 20 Euros, or like 25 bucks, for 1000 kilos or 2200 pounds, which sounds good to me. My three goats just don't produce enough manure for five acres hehe.

I was wondering what the risks are of bringing in horse manure from random people who I'm sure offer them commercial feed alongside pasture.

Thanks!
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Jose Reymondez
Posts: 137
Location: Galicia, Spain Zone 9
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Hehe, Im sure he will.

I should specify that its a for a 2 acre area that's going to be food forest so I would be using the manure around trees that I wouldn't eat from for a few years.
 
John Elliott
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Fungal and bacterial action will degrade any contaminants given some time. John Elliott will be along soon to advise on the best way to proceed.


Thanks, Dale.

Unlike pigs and chickens, we don't share very many common pathogens with horses. And if it isn't fresh (i.e. has sat out in the sun and dried out), it will have even less active bacteria. I've had great results with it in dry desert soil. Because the horse is not a ruminant, the manure is less digested, leaving more nutrients available to build the soil.
 
Jose Reymondez
Posts: 137
Location: Galicia, Spain Zone 9
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Thanks John!

I've read that commercial feeds can have anti-fungal ingredients. I was wondering about that.

Around here commercial feed is used mostly for pigs/lambs so they get fat and chickens so they have more eggs.

There is year-round pasture here (always green, ground never freezes) and most people just pasture their horses since they don't really need to get fattened for eating I'm guessing. So be fair, the manure probably comes from horses who eat mostly pasture with some added grain, Ill ask the sellers what the diet was.

Im excited about the cheapness of it.
 
John Elliott
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Jose Reymondez wrote:
I've read that commercial feeds can have anti-fungal ingredients. I was wondering about that.



Anti-fungals just slow down fungi that are animal pathogens. Enough so that the animal's immune system can kick in. In the environment, they are going to be big juicy organic molecules that some microbe will have an appetite for.

As for the price, don't look a gift horse (manure) in the ______.
 
Johnny Niamert
Posts: 268
Location: Colo
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I've always been warned against vermicides in fresh horse manure. Especially if it's to be used for worm bins.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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It is the medicines they give the horses that would be any problem.

In the US we have big problems with persistent antibiotics and wormers in horse manure.
 
2017 Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs http://richsoil.com/pdc
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