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Where to find fruit and nut trees in N. Az.

 
Posts: 17
Location: northern arizona about 5500 ft
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I was just wondering if there was anybody on this wonderful site that could tell me where to get fruit and nut trees that I can put in the ground this spring. I have heard if you get seedlings or small trees (Im not sure what you would call them) from the same area they will have a better chance getting established also better yields. I am between 5200-5600 ft in Northern Az. Is there anybody out here? Thank You!
 
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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I haven't found anyone in the 4 corners states yet that has fruit trees that I want, so I've been going mostly to Cummins, they are doing a custom grafting order for me. Also a little bit from Fedco and Raintree. Happy with all of them. I figure getting a tree acclimatized to our coldness is most important. The growers on the Pacific Coast want to ship too early for us anyway.

The hard part is that the east coast nurseries are more tuned to acid soils, where mine are alkaline and some things just won't grow regardless. I'm going to order some stuff from Lawyers in Montana this spring, but they sell only in larger quantities. And Badgersett for nuts, but now we are drifting into experiments in my locale.

I remember looking at Tooleys Trees, a nursery in NM, but I they didn't have anything I wanted at the time. Looks like they have some peaches this year. If you find another option, do tell.
 
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Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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what type of trees specifically are you looking to plant? quantities?

more info can us to help you better.

also this link has some good general info-
https://permies.com/t/30793/trees/trees
 
Posts: 53
Location: Northern New Mexico
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Gordon at Tooley's Trees is a great guy and into sustainable practices. They're at 8000+ I believe so he's working with more cold hardy varieties and rootstock.
 
Posts: 2679
Location: Phoenix, AZ (9b)
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I know Dave Wilson Nursery sells trees that would work for N AZ. See their site here: http://davewilson.com/home-gardens

They also indicate where they sell trees locally.

Somewhere on the site (can't find it right now) - you enter in your climate zone and they will show you the best varieties for the climate. I've found them to be pretty accurate for the low, hot desert (something that few people ever get right).
 
Scott Dietrich
Posts: 17
Location: northern arizona about 5500 ft
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Thank You very much everybody for all the info!
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
Posts: 2679
Location: Phoenix, AZ (9b)
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Scott - let us know what varieties you ultimately get and how they work out for you over time.

Best of luck and hope you get loads of yummy fruit in the coming years.
 
Posts: 160
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Burnt Ridge is a Washington nursery that I've bought quite a few trees from. http://www.burntridgenursery.com/default.asp I don't think you need to match up trees from your immediate area, but you do need to match things for your USDA zone. Not knowing your area, I'd guess you're at about Zone 6. Take a look at this map of Arizona. http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-arizona-usda-plant-zone-hardiness-map.php Pay more attention to your winter lows on the scale rather than just the color of your immediate area.

Once you know your zone, you can match trees that will like that area. I'm guessing that zone 4-5-6 apples will like it there, but not a warm-weather zone 8-9 apple. Same with peaches for example. I shopped on-line for peaches that had "frost hardy" in the first line of their description. Another helpful guide is Sunset's "Western Gardening Book". http://www.amazon.com/The-New-Western-Garden-Book/dp/0376039205 My copy has a full page map of Arizona, detailing it's local climatic zones, though with different numbers than the USDA zones.

I've purchased trees from other nurseries than Burnt Ridge, but I like them because they carry a wide range of "alternative" plants that homesteaders would be interested in.

Good luck!
 
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