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Periwinkle question

 
Posts: 141
Location: UK
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I have come across a ground dwelling plant growing near me, apparently its called periwinkle. there isn't much i have found out online about it except that it does well in forest gardens and can be invasive. does anyone know if it edible, or beneficial in someway, i plucked some anyway, and potted it, just need to know if it will be fine to throw in among the back of the garden, possibly for wildlife,
 
pollinator
Posts: 1529
Location: northern California
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I would avoid it unless you have plenty of space or else a problem site like a steep or eroding bank, where the vines and runners can help stablilize it. It's a known invasive in the USA (both Vinca minor and Vinca major, both called periwinkle), and I believe it is also poisonous, except for the nectar in the flowers which it is possible to suck out after picking the flower free from the base.
 
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I planted vinca minor, aka periwinkle, all over my yard. It has beautiful, blue spring flowers that are striking against all the daffodils. I don't think it's poisonous because I've seen deer eat it. It grows well in shade and sun, and pretty thick, with little to no irrigation, so it's a great ground cover, attractive even when not in bloom. And I've had no problems with invasiveness here in Utah. So maybe it's more ornamental than useful, but there is something to be said for soothing the soul as well as the belly, right?
 
fiona smith
Posts: 141
Location: UK
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yes they are pretty,

i was thinking of planting it in deep shade right at the back of the garden to cover the bare soil round the trunks of some maples, as not much else except nettles will grow,
 
pollinator
Posts: 1376
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I am not a weed hater but this one I would never plant. It was used medicinally though, but it is a poisonous plant. It looks pretty.
Our neighbour planted one. It is next to impossible to get rid of. He paid two gardeners and they did a half job. I hoed it out of our garden three times and the other neighbour has it too. It even crossed the road and I saw it coming out at the other side at the bus stop!
 
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