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How do trees survive winter? (video)

 
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and now you know.

 
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Craig Dobbelyu wrote:and now you know.



And knowing is half the battle.
 
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cool educational video.
 
Mother Tree
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Which makes me wonder about the oft-heard advice that it's not freezing that kills plants, but thawing. It would seem to me that the damage from ice crystals would be done during the freeze but just might not be apparent until the thaw.
 
Cris Bessette
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One of my hobbies is growing citrus trees.
They can be vulnerable through the Winter in my definitely non-citrus zone.

Citrus trees are more like conifers in how they handle Winter cold as they are generally evergreens.
Most go into dormancy when they start consistently being exposed to temperatures below 55F (13C) or so.

Some types of citrus are not hardy at all, and some are extremely hardy (Sweet oranges vs Kumquats for instance)








 
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