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Farming in my urban kitchen  RSS feed

 
Angela Brown
Posts: 41
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I have finally decided that if I don't do something now I will never do anything ever! I want to homestead, but my apartment makes it really tough, though not impossible. I have let the years and bad choices get me down. No longer! Paul has truly inspired me to do something...ANYTHING to further my goal! So I have started sprouting in my kitchen. My daughter is always begging me to go to the Asian grocer to get bean sprouts so she can snack on them. Well I know those things at the store are so risky and have the highest recall rate of any produce so I picked up some mung beans and they are happily sprouting away in my pressure cooker right now! When I get home I will try to remember to take pictures and post them here. Community gardens in my neck of the woods are more about who you know than just waiting until your name comes up on the waiting list. Well I finally met the "right" people and am >< this clost to getting my small plot for the summer. I know small steps lead to big changes so I am going to do only what doesn't overwhelm me, but I am really excited!
 
Myron Weber
Posts: 67
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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Thanks for posting this. I love sprouts and for some reason have gotten out of the habit lately - I'll start up again.
 
Katrin Kerns
Posts: 126
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Angela, do you have a balcony?

I live in an apartment as well, and I'm working on trying to turn my balcony into a micro food forest. You can find my blog about it here if you're interested. http://organicwithattitude.tumblr.com/ I'm still only in the beginning stages of it, but you might be able to get some idea's from the things I'm trying as well. Hang in there, it is possible.

Kat
 
Lucas Harrison-Zdenek
Posts: 90
Location: Southeast Michigan, Zone 6a
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Sprouting is a great way to add more nutrition to your diet! I've never done it myself, but I do buy fresh pea shoots from a guy at my local farmer's market. I eat them raw or put them on sandwiches instead of lettuce. There are all sorts of sprouting kits out there to help you continue to do this. There are plenty of apartment growing books on the internet as well. Keep it up!
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 924
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Years ago I attended a food growing course and the speaker started out by presenting the scenario that lots of people have found themselves in.....what if you lose your job and need to go on an instant severe budget. He then went on to talk about how to grow supplemental foods quickly. The number one item to start immediately was sprouts. They give you useable food really fast. They can be eaten raw as snacks, in salads, in sandwiches. They can be stir fried, sautéed, added to soups and stews. Even added to bread, pancakes, rice.

The speaker suggested buying seeds in bulk for sprouting and to be very careful to avoid all treated seeds. Lots of seeds make for good sprouts. Mung beans, radishes and daikon, alfalfa, most beans, peas, basil, anise, amaranth, broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, collards, kale, celery, chickpeas, sunflower, pigeon peas and cowpeas, bok chops, Chinese cabbages, leek, onion, chives, millet, mustard, and turnip. I haven't tried them but I know of other people who have sprouted wheat, oats, barley, clover, flax, canola (rape), Lima beans, buckwheat, sesame, and pumpkin.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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I am often impressed at how much children will chow down on sprouts, especially alfalfa.

It's such a fun thing to do with kids, starting out with a little scoop of seeds and ending up with a jar full.

Our local food co-op sells seeds in bulk, as in they buy a bulk package and you can buy add little or as much as you want. This is a good way to try out different seeds. I love spicy sprouts like radish but the kids prefer milder ones.
 
Angela Brown
Posts: 41
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Myron, let us know what you sprouted and how you used them. I sprout but then I can't think of enough ways to use them so I just eat them right out of the container or on a sammie.

Katrin, would you believe my biggest wall is south facing looking out on about 30 feet of unobstructed balcony that I am not allowed to even step on per my apartment lease! BOOOOOOOOO!!! LOL So I only have south facing sill free windows.

Lucas, Sprouts are delicious and there are so many kinds just like Su Ba pointed out! You would be surprised at how simple they are to grow! Try it!

Su I have been wanting to try a lot of the seeds you mentioned. I am slowly working my way through them.

Matu, I like them spicy too!
 
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