• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Early spring/Winter plant ID  RSS feed

 
William James
gardener
Posts: 1014
Location: Northern Italy
23
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,
These popped up recently and I'm not sure what they are.

1. An onion-chicory hybrid looking thing. There are about 10 or so in the beds. I thought for a second that it could be comfrey, but comfrey has fuzzy fat leaves, so I think not. It could just be a kind of grass I'm not familiar with.

2. A winter plant which is nice in salads but I don't know what it is (oops). Has a white flower. Last year we were full of it. We unfortunately weeded it out and ate some, so this year it's kind of hanging back.

3. We think it might be a radish-like plant. This kind of took over the bed, tons of them. Either we planted the seed and it took off or it was in the manure or biomass we added to the bed. It has a slight peppery taste.


Thanks in advance,
William
plant-id-1.jpg
[Thumbnail for plant-id-1.jpg]
plant-id-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for plant-id-2.jpg]
plant-id-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for plant-id-3.jpg]
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 2091
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
185
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The first one is in the onion family, but I can't say what, exactly. Edible, AFAIK

The second one might be arugula, AKA "rocket." It's not an improved cultivated variety, but the "wilder" types of arugula can have separated leaves like that. Arugula sends up a spike with white (off white) flowers.

The third one, sorry--I have no idea!
 
William James
gardener
Posts: 1014
Location: Northern Italy
23
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The second comes up between the cracks in pavement sometimes. I've noticed it elsewhere. I suppose it could be an arugula, the taste is definitely there.

The onion family one has a weird root for being in the onion family.

Thanks for the observations.
William
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
William, does 1. smell oniony?
If so, that's a total giveaway. If not, it reminds me a bit of salsify, which has very unusual daffodil/allium-looking leaves.
It has a long, hairy taproot though, which I can't see here.
 
William James
gardener
Posts: 1014
Location: Northern Italy
23
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Leila,
Yes, 1 does smell a little oniony. I suppose it could be a salsify, as we did have those seeds around and they might have gotten planted.
W
 
Gwen Dell'Anno
Posts: 2
Location: Alberta, Canada
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
#3 looks like Oxeye Daisy to me. I moved perennials across the country (to where there are no daisies) and 3 years later I still have them coming up in my garden beds. I yank them out as soon as I see them.... considered noxious weeds here.
 
dirk maes
Posts: 70
Location: belgium
4
fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1. salsify, if you cut the root, does it give a milky sap?
2. looks like Cardamine hirsute, hairy bitter-cress. the seed caps burst open when ever seeds are ripe.
3. looks like garden cress. it should taste peppery and like cress.
 
I would challenge you to a battle of wits, but I see you are unarmed - shakespear. Unarmed tiny ad:
Composting Chickens Comic (e)Book - The Ulitmate Guide to Compsting with Chickens - Digital Download
https://permies.com/t/66064/digital-market/digital-market/Composting-Chickens-Comic-Book-Ulitmate
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!