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Mushrooms in a desert swale

 
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One of the results of our rainfall from 6 weeks ago in Makkah.
 
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Neal , that is wild!

Looks like they came up in compacted disturbed soil.

Would there have been organic material underneath?

How common is that fungus in the area around you?
 
Neal Spackman
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Hey Miles,

it is disturbed--it's sitting on about a foot of silted up swale that would have had a little bit of compost underneath, but not more than a couple inches. It's not really compacted though--i was the first one walking on it. The fungus has a local name but it's very rare to see.
 
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Wow!! Neal, thanks as always for posting. That's a pretty positive feedback loop for your project.

Fungus is so rare in desert climates, at least on the surface. Every once in awhile I'll get some "dog vomit slime mold" on my woodchip mulch. And sometimes in a shady, cool spot I'll get a few above ground fungi.

 
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Oooh Jen,

That's pretty
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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It's attractive in both name and form, no?

What's funny is that these often occur near where my drip irrigation is and usually it is in a smallish disc shape. Inevitably these dry up here in our high-evap conditions and they form a kind of natural Frisbee! Next time this occurs, I'll take a pic.
 
Neal Spackman
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On second thought, yes this was somewhat compacted by a Bobcat we had moving some rocks to some other earthworks--you can see the tracks in the video.
 
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Neal Spackman wrote: The fungus has a local name but it's very rare to see.



Then you are doing something right! I would just add that when you see mushrooms, that means that the hyphal network wanst to propagate to new places. Take those mushrooms, even if they are dried, and whiz them up with some water and get them started on new piles of dead biomass. Let's not be lazy permaculturalists and wait for the wind to disperse the spores; let's do some active spore propagation!
 
Neal Spackman
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Hey John...

Dead piles of biomass are pretty rare in these parts! When I tested the soil for organic content they told me it was 95% sand and 5% silicates...
 
John Elliott
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Paper and cardboard will do in a pinch. Do they have paper shredders in Saudi Arabia? Surely they must have upgraded from the old clay tablet technology.....
 
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I'm wondering if these are related to the fungus Geoff Lawton speaks of in the video I'm linking below (02:30) This fungus seems to be desalinating the soil around it.

 
Neal Spackman
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John Elliott wrote:Paper and cardboard will do in a pinch. Do they have paper shredders in Saudi Arabia? Surely they must have upgraded from the old clay tablet technology.....



I actually have a compost pile where i'll put it--it becomes part of the soil i plant our saplings with so it can provide some innoculation.
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