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permaculture nursery

 
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So I am working on putting together my business plan for my permaculture nursery business. I already have a lot of ideas about what I want to grow and sell, but I was hoping I could get some input from some permies who have a lot more experience than I do. Firstly, in your opinion what would be the five most important permaculture plants to cultivate and sell, and secondly, in your opinion what would be the most profitable 5 plants to grow and sell. Ready set go!
 
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Where? what target? (sub)urban or small acreage? Onsite sales or internet or both?

1. The best legume tree for your climate. Lots of them at a fair price, in growing tubes and rent the corresponding planter.
2. The "odd" trees for your environment, those things that every permaculture book talks about but you just can't find. Pawpaw, lucearne, all kinds of acacias, etc.
3. bamboo
 
gardener
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Location: Soutwest Ohio
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There have been two recent discussions centered around commercial greenhouses/nurseries. One is my own and the other I can't seem to find just now. One very valid point that was brought up and which I can confirm from my years working for a commercial greenhouse is that annuals make up the bulk of sales if for no other reason than most people don't know anything else. It will take time to work people towards something other than a year to year style of gardening.

Comfrey seems to be a plant you will want. It is one of those extremely useful plants, is easy to propagate and can be an easy way to get people moving in the right direction with a small investment on their part.

 
John Brownlee
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this last weekend I just planted four comfrey root cuttings that I got from horizon herbs that I will work into my own permaculture garden and become future rootstock. I want to start with the common fruit bearing plants that most people are familiar with blueberries blackberries raspberries apples pears peaches etcetera. That will be a resale operation to earn extra income to supplement my current pay while I get seeds going of all of the more unusual permie plants which I Will sale both online and grow into larger plants to sale to the local market.
 
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The best plants to sell are the ones you are most excited about. They are easy to talk to folks about and you will know them well and enjoy growing them. It feels more honest to sell what you want to go out into the world rather than what you think people might buy. Good luck and happy growing this year.
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Since you have not included your location, we have no idea which plants will thrive in your region. Your best local sales will be what people know will grow on their land. You could get more for the exotics, but they would require more time and effort to grow an a wholesale level. Even if you baby them along and sell them locally, you will get few repeat customers if the plants do not perform well on their land.

Try to stick with the plants that perform well in your region. It will make your job much easier, and be the best income in the long run.

 
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