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Grafted Plum Tree has no Leaves, only Blossoms

 
Dustin Powers
Posts: 42
Location: Washington State
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I planted this grafted plum tree, along with 6 other ones on my south facing food forest in the fall of 2012. It sent leaves and grew normally last year like the rest of them. This year the rest have leaves and new growth shoots, this one is completely white with blossom. Literaly 100% flowers.

Any one else see this before? Ill post pictures in the morning.
 
Amy Woodhouse
Posts: 48
Location: NC, Zone 7
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This is a completely normal activity for plums. Now, if they have not started to leaf out in two weeks there may be an issue. Around here, the wild plums look like puff balls right now... makes them one of the easier trees to spot in the spring and note the locations for June and July fruit harvesting adventures.
 
Dustin Powers
Posts: 42
Location: Washington State
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So if this is normal, I wonder what type of indicator it is?
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Amy Woodhouse
Posts: 48
Location: NC, Zone 7
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Are they the same variety and age?
 
Dustin Powers
Posts: 42
Location: Washington State
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Same everything, from the same nursery, same general location, planted at the same time
 
Amy Woodhouse
Posts: 48
Location: NC, Zone 7
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It looks like to me the one that is blooming is of larger caliper. Are some closer to that gravel than others?
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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It seems to me like they all broke bud dormancy at the same time.
Some plants had 100% of their buds as fruit buds, others had 50% of their buds as fruit/flower buds and another probably had only 5% of the buds as fruit buds and the rest as leave buds.

Do a google search on flower bud vs leaf bud.
http://www.waldeneffect.org/blog/Flower_buds_vs._leaf_buds/

Maybe you pruned the others ones more so they put on more vegetative growth (waterspout).
Maybe this one is thicker/older/mature so it is at that age where it produces.
This plant might be one that fruits alot in year 1 and then none in year 2 where it saves up alot of sugar and then fruits alot in year 3, even though it is the same cultivar.
Maybe this plant is being stressed alot (pest, copper nail?, etc) so it thinks it is going to die and puts all its energy into a last ditch plan to create some offspring.
Or this plant could have an abundance of nutrients and thus had amble to but into flower production.


If the plants has more flower than it can supply sugar to, the plant will produce less the next year, and it will create a vicious cycle so it is best to prevent some of the fruits from developing too far. Less than 3 weeks. Normally the tree will drop alot of what it cannot handle or are malformed (not pollinated, etc)
 
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FoodForestCardGame.com
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