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Produce stand - Interior Door?  RSS feed

 
Sherri Lynn
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Location: Piedmont, NC
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I am going to be building a Produce stand for the front corner of our small farm. I am trying to utilize materials we already have to both save money and clean up the barn. I have a door with frame that my husband says is an interior door. As this is a shed, I was wondering if there was any kind of alteration I could make to it so the door I have would work.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi,

I really need to see the door, and know the design of the stand to answer that.

Regards,

j
 
Sherri Lynn
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The door is a 32" six panel door that looks like solid wood to me with a solid wood frame.



If this doesn't come out right, you can see at at my blog: www.powellacres.com Click on Produce Stand.

Thanks for your advice. I could put some kind of Overhang over the door if I need to, but there's not much room.
 
Burra Maluca
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I think these are the photos.



 
Sherri Lynn
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Thanks Burra Maluca! I need a how to on that as well. . . .
 
R Scott
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Those doors LOOK solid, but are pressed masonite (heavy cardboard) and they don't use the best glue (less toxic, but not so water resistant).

If you get a really good coat of paint ALL AROUND it (including bottom, top, inside doorknob hole, under hinges) it may last a while if you have to use it now, but eventually would need replacing. I would save it for an interior job where it will last a lifetime if you can.
 
Burra Maluca
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Quick how-to.

Get the image you want on the screen. Right click on it. Select 'copy img url.

Within the post, click Img button. Paste the url into the little box that appears.

 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi Sherri,

O.k. that helps, I will try to take what R. Scott wrote a few steps further. If the door is indeed some form of "particulate materials," it is best left to the interior of a structure. How you tell will also assess your skill sets. Take a "block plane," and plane some wood off the ends, sides, and a little off the face of a rail or panel. If solid wood is revealed great, if not, the door will only last a few seasons at best in most cases. Especially with a modern paint applied to them.

Now on finishes, I won't say "don't paint" but I will stress that most "modern paints" do little more than trap moisture inside wood and/or the material they are applied to. I typically use natural oils and if I want color, I will pigment the oil which can create an opaque stain or actual oil paint depending on formulation. You can also use a "Milk" or "lime paint" which will last a few seasons. The senescence of these natural milk and lime finishes reveals a gradual, and pleasing effect over time. With all of these natural finishes, the key element is the protection of the underlying material they are applied to, thereby acting as a true "sacrificial layer" without inhibiting permeability, like modern latexes and other contemporary paints, which traps interstitial moisture and facilitates decomposition and deterioration.

Regards,

j
 
Sherri Lynn
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Thanks. The door seems to be solid wood, as you can see the wood under the hinge. Also, the inset on the door has a dent in it. My experience with masonite has been in the past that if it had that kind of dent, it would have torn to pieces.

Another question: I'm using a framing nailer to put together the walls. The wood seems to have a tendency to split (which it hasn't done before using the same paslode nail gun.) The nails do seem to be overdriving a bit. The reg. pressure on the air compressor looks to be on about 85, while the tank pressure looks to be about 140. Any helpful hints?
 
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