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Check out this natural "Food Forest" growing wild... in terrible soil

 
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I made a really cool find the other day:

http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com/2014/04/can-you-grow-fruit-trees-in-bad-soil.html

Check out the crazy plant communities going on there. It's an abundant woodland edge system on lousy scrubland soil, right at the entrance to a neighborhood.

Now that I know this natural food-producing system is there, I'm living in fear of it getting cleared. I need to look up the lot in the county tax office and see if I can contact the owner.

People are always asking me if you can grow food forests "anywhere." I think the answer is "almost."
 
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Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
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Very cool find! Hardy natives are always inspirational to see. If you cannot contact the owner do you plan to take any cuttings or transplants? Maybe you will be able to purchase the lot?
 
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Location: Montmagny, Qu├ębec, Canada (zone 4b)
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I was coming to the trend to ask a question about land working before planting. Like a lot of people know by now, We have old fields that are now growing wild with a lot of grass of all kind. I was woundering if it is really necessary to wok and mulch to come to bare land before planting since I have a HUUUUGE land. Then I read this post...I guess now I can do without

thank you

isabelle
 
David Good
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@Zach: Unfortunately, pawpaws are basically impossible to propagate via any method other than seed... but I'll be watching for fruit. The blueberries? I'll totally take some cuttings after they're done fruiting, hopefully with the lot-owner's permission.
 
David Good
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@Isabelle

Isabelle, You're very welcome. I don't bother clearing much when I plant... just enough to make sure my up-and-coming trees don't get overwhelmed. Grass and woods are in a constant battle... a truce between prarie and woodland seems to be the goal for highest food forest productivity. I actually wrote a little on avoiding the "scorched earth" mentality here:

http://www.floridasurvivalgardening.com/2014/03/planning-food-forest-dont-go-scorched.html

There are wiser food forest folks than myself here at permies... you might still start a thread and see what knowledge can be gleaned. This is the place to be.
 
Hey, check out my mega multi devastator cannon. It's wicked. It makes this tiny ad look weak:
Native Bee Guide by Crown Bees
https://permies.com/wiki/105944/Native-Bee-Guide-Crown-Bees
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