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Weeping Willow Cuttings for Fedge?

 
Jenna Sanders
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Location: Michigan, zone 5
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I haven't been able to find an answer to this question yet, so here it is.
I want to put in an inexpensive privacy fence, and love the look of the willow fences. But, I don't want to buy willow cuttings if I can find and cut them myself. Can I use weeping willow cuttings for this project? Or do I need a different variety? If so, what is it and can I easily find it to get cuttings?
Does any know anything about this? Thanks!
 
Miles Flansburg
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John Polk
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Weeping willows are beautiful trees, BUT very thirsty trees.
About the only place I have ever seen them is next to a creek.

Without a constant source of water, they will not prosper.

 
Rebecca Norman
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Jenna,
Here in Ladakh we plant willows from cuttings all the time, but there are almost no weeping willows in the area. Weeping or not, willows will root fine from cuttings. But I'm afraid you might be a week or two too late, now, in late April. Once the leaf buds start swelling out and showing green, in my experience those cuttings don't root well. If you do it in earlier spring before any signs of green, stamp your cuttings into the ground well, and water frequently during the first season, there is a very high rate of success.

The climate is very dry here, but if willows get watered every 5 or 7 days they seem to do fine. Well, that's the willow varieties here. We pollard them every three years once they are established, and use the poles for tool handles, planting new willows, roofing sticks, and firewood.
 
Cj Sloane
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John Polk wrote:
Without a constant source of water, they will not prosper.


I bet planting them in the bottom of a swale would work. I've seen lots of willows in fields here in Vermont but our precip is pretty high.
 
Jenna Sanders
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Location: Michigan, zone 5
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I was thinking the same thing, CJ. We don't really have a problem growing willows here- they grow everywhere, the the added moisture from the swale can only help. My main concern is, can I use a weeping willow in a fedge? Because those are what I have around to take cuttings from.
 
Cj Sloane
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Jenna Sanders wrote:My main concern is, can I use a weeping willow in a fedge?


You can totally use willows for a fence or a hedge but technically it wouldn't be a fedge (a food hedge).
 
Lance Kleckner
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You can use it for a fedge, but weeping growth may get in the way compared to upright willows.
 
John Polk
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Hey. At least you'll have a nice shady spot to take a break.
A friend has a BBQ, & whole 'patio' set up under an aged one. Like a spare den/family room in summer.

 
Cj Sloane
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Lance Kleckner wrote:You can use it for a fedge,


Where's the food part?
 
Lance Kleckner
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Cj Verde wrote:
Lance Kleckner wrote:You can use it for a fedge,


Where's the food part?


Fence + Hedge= Fedge, there is no food part unless you are a rabbit.
 
Cj Sloane
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In permaculture, fedge = food + hedge.

edit: there are clearly multiple definitions including some unsavory ones at urban dictionary. However, in Permaculture I think fedge is a food bearing hedge generally, because you're at least stacking functions.
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