• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Thistle identification  RSS feed

 
Posts: 1916
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can someone help me ID these thistles please. Our pasture is being over run. They are viciously spiky - not at all like some if the smooth leaved varieties I have seen and heard of. The sheep won't touch them and we are loosing more and more land to them each year.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1916
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Our brilliant thistle puller - using it on smaller patches and paths to clear. The whole field is too big a job by hand.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1916
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These photos don't really do it's vicious prickles justice. We also have more nettles that I'd like and a lot of spreading Arum Maculatum (Lords and Ladies - toxic to animals, clumps spread 30cm per year and it seems nearly impossible to kill!)

I know the root of the problems is how the land has been overgrazed in the past. We have pretty much got the local shepherd on side about using some electric fencing and rotating them through the field, so the grass shouldn't ever end up quite so short and bare again. I'd also like to establish some more plant species - clovers and herbs etc... but that is a thread for another day.
 
Mother Tree
Posts: 10486
Location: Portugal
1192
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar tiny house wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks like creeping thistle, which according to wikki is also known as Canadian thistle.
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1916
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree it fits most of the description - but from what I have seen of pulling roots it is mostly tap rooted rather than spreading. It also looks like most of our plants have grown from seed, based on the spread of the smaller ones and the root systems evident.

I'm hoping that we have a biennial rather than perennial variety.
 
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks more like Bull Thistle.
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1916
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Mitch, that definitely looks like a contender. Description and photo matches really well.

Biennial - forms rosettes in the first year, flowering spikes in second.

Seems to spread by seed rather than creeping.

Seems like control may be about preventing germination by making sure the grass is dense and not overgrazed in winter. Perhaps combine with topping the flowering spikes before thy seed - sharp hoe? Scythe?

Cheers again - Mike
 
The City calls upon her steadfast protectors. Now for a tiny ad:
What would you cook first in a rocket oven?
https://permies.com/t/89866/cook-rocket-oven
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!