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Planting In Horse Manure.

 
gardener
Posts: 2483
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I have aged horse manure at my disposal. I also have containers/beds to plant and a new 105 x 35' lot with rock and clay for soil.
So I am considering using the horse manure to fill the containers, top up the raised beds and blanket the new lot.
I would then plant directly in the stuff.
Expected outcome?
Disaster? Massive yeilds?
Weeds? Actually weeds seem likely but them I can deal with.

Let me know what you think

 
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
59
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William Bronson : Hopefully you are now seeing ether the mushroom treads deep down in the manure, or the Mushroom fruiting bodies!
a healthy population of Myco-rysomes is vital to your garden ! As the minerals in a form that your plant can use will come from the soil
and not so much from the manure you want at least 2/3rds dirt to manure ! Good Luck ! big AL !
 
pollinator
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I had a very similar situation when I lived in Las Vegas and my next door neighbor had 3 horses (yes, there are little rural neighborhoods in various parts of Sin City). I shoveled and shoveled and shoveled dried and dessicated horse manure over the block wall and planted directly into it. I got excellent results, and almost nothing in the way of weed seeds sprouting.
 
steward
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Back in my pre-permies days I would put a foot of dried manure on the garden every year and till it in. Always worked good for me.
 
William Bronson
gardener
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Very encouraging! I only have a E-150 van for transport right now , and a bad back as well, so it may take a while, but I will transform my landscape, no matter how long it takes.
 
Posts: 155
Location: PNW, British Columbia
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I would say it probably depends on what you plant in there the first year?

I also happen to have for the first time a load of aged horse manure to work with. I will be growing squash in those mounds I've made.
 
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It can work but there are some things you have to watch out for. I learned this the hard way. Look at the post i made on the subject so i don't have to retype it all here. Learn from my bad experience and not your own.

If you want to grow that stuff that wont grow well in straight compost then you should throw a layer of dirt on top.

https://permies.com/t/35440/gardening-beginners/FYI-straight-compost-limited-utility
 
Posts: 154
Location: Central New York - Finger Lakes - Zone 5
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Whenever it's suggested that plants are to be grown in a specific medium like manure or compost I'm reminded of all the macro and micro nutrients that plants need to be really healthy and produce at their very best. It is very unlikely that any single manure or compost contains all of these elements which is why adding organic diversity to soil produces the very best results. I would mix that manure with some compost and good topsoil and (dare I say it), maybe even a little peat moss to produce the best planting mix.

(ponder this: manure from a grass fed cow may be sought after for the organic garden. But the manure is the waste product after the cow has extracted the nutrition it needs. Adding the grass directly (or indirectly as compost) to the soil seems to make more sense [unless you have cows and lots of manure!]...?)
 
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