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Tree Identification Please

 
Gregg Bolinger
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We just bought a home so inherited some landscaping and I'm hoping that someone can identify a few trees.

I'm pretty sure this one is a Chanticleer pear but would like some confirmation.
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Gregg Bolinger
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I don't know what either of these are.
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Gregg Bolinger
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Here's another one:
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Location: Portland Oregon
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I'm not real good at plant ID, I can usually get the kind of tree, but the variety often elludes me.
The ornamental pear is pretty easy, white bossems and very upright growth the bark should be a medium to light brown and kinda glossy.
Likewise the leaning plum, those pink wispy blossems shout out plum, as does the very  rough very dark bark.
The deep purplely red, small tight blossems are indicitive of a Redbud as is the general unruly shape and the dark bark.
The big bushy tree with the not quite open red blossems looks like a crabapple, the leaves are a dead giveaway that it's an apple, the light brownish greenish smooth bark helps, I'm guessing crabapple because of the growth habit and the red blossems.
 
                      
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The tall white one looks to me like a bradford pear. A popular landscape tree that dosn't stand up to winds well and have stinky blossoms.

The little pink one is a redbud.

The others look like crabapples to me.
 
rose macaskie
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Is the purplish one the judas tree,  the tree of love or buddhaa tree to mention all its coloquial names. which tree also has  tree has  as pretty deep coloured blossoms and they can come out of the trunk. It has bean pods maybe its from the legume family.
  i agree about the last two being a crab, japanese crab i bought one for my brother in laws garden before i had a garden of my own. It gives deep coloured crab apples and so you can make crab apple jelly.
      Is the pinkish one a peach? rose.
 
                                        
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I'd agree about the crabapple.  I planted one in the front yard of my previous house about five years ago.  Growth habit, leaves, flowers . . .looked exactly like that though my flowers blushed pink instead of the darker color of yours.  Even the little colored "pimples" (can't think of a better descriptor) on the smooth younger bark looks the same.  Cool tree.  Nice character, but they can get really "leggy" so they benefit from prunning.  A mockingbird used to hang out in mine a lot.  He liked to eat the crabapples, I didn't much care for them but I read that  you can make a nice jelly from them if you have the right variety.  I never tried, but was happy to watch that mocking bird year after year.
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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I'd also agree about the crabapple. The leaves are very distinctly apple, but the flowers are much different from domesticated apples.
 
rose macaskie
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THe flowers of the crab apple the last tree are exactly like the flowers of a japanes crab apple.  When i refered to the deep purple -ish flowers of the buddha tree, i meant pink of a purple pink type and for pink a deep colour.does it have heart shaped leaves? rose
 
Brenda Groth
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what lovely trees you have inherited with your new property
 
Erica Wisner
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I'd guess #2 is what we used to call a cherry-plum, ornamental plum with small fruits, burgundy-red or bronze leaves.

Looks like whoever planted your yard had the same tastes as the folks that did the yard I grew up with.  We had that dark-pink-flowering crabapple (#3), too.
 
                                      
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Redbud is family Leguminosae, subfamily Caesalpinioidae.  I have never seen it mentioned as an N-fixer so I went out and dug up a young seedling (second year) and, sure enough, there were the characteristic nodules on the roots.  I brought this up at a Well Fed Neighbor meeting and just about had a local "expert" on Permaculture plants ream me a new one.  As far as he was concerned, Redbud is not an N-fixer and has no real stacking value at all.

Hmmm.  Redbud is a great addition to my hedgerow.  It makes and excellent nurse species.  It has edible flowers and leaves (rich in vit. c and a) and produces a seed valued, and even relied upon, by native turkey, quail, and my chickens.  It is beautiful in the spring (blossoms) and in the fall (foliage), and by the way, in the fall it produces copious mulch.  And according to my own study and observation, it is an N-fixing small tree.  The bark even smokes nice.  Reminds me of dogwood with a fruity after taste.
 
rose macaskie
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Crab apples, apart from having dark red flowers which only the Japanese crab is and i know it, a good acid apple that works well for crab apple jelly, is  a valuable tree  because crab apples are good for making crab apple jelly, this jelly is the English alternative to sweet and sour sauce, jam made of the juice of the fruit so what you get is a beautiful transparent red jelly eaten with ham and lamb.
    Red currants are also used for making a jelly, traditionally also eaten with meat.

      I also have a decorative plum, mu husbands family have an old one in the garden so I thought he would like it. As an old tree had its attractions, a thick trunk and it was always in flower at Easter time, it gave fruit too.

        The best  jams are made of pretty sour fruit so crab apples are what you need for jam making.  Apples make a very tasteless jam except if you pick them unripe and a bit sour and cook up lots of them and treat three kilos of apples as one kilo of crabs and then make jam with the boiled down juice of the apples so the juice is stronger than it would be if it weren't boiled down.
      Experiment, even though you waste some apples in the end you will know how to make good apple jelly.
      I have one crab apple tree but its fruit are not as sour as the ones of the Japanese crab I know, so i want to have a Japanese crab apple. I don’t know how many people make jam in America. I have just read in the pemaculture magazine, which is English, that not many people know how to in England, so it is important to give out all your jam making information. The situation might be very different in America..

        I cook the crab apples in water for a hour say, i have known jam makers who cook them with the sugar and for a shorter for a shorter amount of time. I think the longer you cook them the more likely the pips are  to give up their pectin. Which is good for the health of your intestines. 
      Most people cook the fruit with the sugar, same weight of sugar to fruit and water to stop the whole burning. Look up recipes in google for exact quantities. When done they strain off the fruit, that is when it is a jelly you are making and when you have strained off the fruit you are left with juice, the jelly.
      I strain of the fruit with a colander or sieve and the jelly comes out clear. Perfectionists strain it through a jelly bag which in its most serious form is to strain it through something that looks like an upside down felt hat.
    You can take the scum off the top of the jam as it cooks and throws up froth, I don’t bother with this rule any more than I bother with jelly bags, I find the scum I scope off the top of the jam only turns back into jam again in the plate I put it into an dit seems to be the most lellyfied part of the juice or I only bother with it a bit and the jam comes out fine. 
  When I have cooked the apples I drain them and then add the sugar and cook the juice with sugar till it reaches the point when it will set like jam does.
    Cooking the fruit for a while without the sugar was an idea i got from an old recipe and it seems to me that it lessens the time you are cooking the fruit with the sugar in it and so have to be especially careful to stir the jam all the time to stop it burning at the bottom. Stirring your jam is one of the things that makes jam making bothersome and the other is that the recipes say the jam only needs to be boiled for twenty minutes and I always find myself stirring for an hour maybe more before it will set a bit but more experienced jam makers than me make jam quicker than I do.

    To find out if the jam is ready  you take out a teaspoonful of the jam every so often, when you feel it must be nearly cooked, and put it on a plate and wait a while for it to get cold and then tip the plate so the drop of jam moves. If it is going to set as it should, the blob of jam on your plate will, in cooling, have  formed a slight skin and will have thickened a bit, so that the blob wrinkles up a bit and the jam will not run. If the wrinkles are very fine it is not ready yet. I often get jam too thick and sometimes too runny, which means you have to cook it again.

    The  recipes i know of for jam making say, that you need  a pound of sugar for a pound of fruit and with this knowledge i just guess how much i am going to put in the juice i have from cooking my crab apples.
    The jam point will be reach when enough liquid has boiled off so it does not matter much if you don’t put in the exact amount of sugar to fruit juiced.  I would like jam to be less sweet and affect my teeth less negatively.

    Things like jelly and jam take a while to set completely, like a 24 hours so the plate test will not let you see how it is when it is fully set, it will just let you know if it is going to set properly.

    Sugar works to stop the fruit from rotting so jam is a conserve, as is salting meat say.  If you put in too little sugar, you run the risk of making a mixture that will go off with time.


    Jam making is a sister to sweet making if you make toffee you put sugar into water and cook it up. I used to make toffee apples as a child. The toffee goes golden when the water evaporates and the sugar starts to toast but very soon after it goes golden it suddenly goes black, burns, so you have to take it off the heat quickly when it starts to go golden, remembering it will go on getting a bit more golden after you take it off the heat, it takes a little bit of time to cool down. That is how to make toffee apple toffee, if you want nicer toffee, you put butter into your mix and it comes out a bit softer. If you put in too much water you just have to wait a long time for it to toffee.
      The moment when the sugar in your water sets to make a thick liquid as it does in jam, is earlier then the toffee making point in the cooking process.     
      There is a jam thermometer which tells you when your jam reaches jam point it is probably well worth having, I always over or under cook jam with my cooling on a plate test. No body in this house eats jam, I have to give it away. 
 
    A jam thermometer or jam and sugar thermometer works to tell you when jam is done because, as the percentage of sugar in your jam gets greater because the water evaporates off as it cooks, the liquid boils at a higher and higher temperature, sugar boils at a higher temperature than water, so if your mix reaches a certain temperature you know it will set like jam, it is a way of knowing what percentage of sugar there is to water.
      Jam also sets because there is pectin in the stones and pips of the fruit which substance is good for your digestive tract. Pectin behaves like jelly and is incorporated into at least some jam making sugars, you don’t have to buy special sugar to make jam, but you can.

      If you go on cooking your jam beyond the jam point you will be into making sweets.  as your mixture gets hotter it will hit the fudge mark fudge though has fats in it, it is made with cream or condensed milk instead of water . At another temperature it is possible to make Edinburgh rock a delicious sweet and only to be found in Scotland as far as I know, it has a chalky texture, you have to pull and double your softish toffee like substance while still warm again and again  to get it to go chalky. The next would be toffee or boiled sweets mark or dead hard sugar mark. I am spouting this out from memory so its bound to be a bit wrong, it comes from what my mother said to me years ago. Look it all up in google to get real recipes. 
 
rose macaskie
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cloud piler, a cousin of mine who likes old things said that their were 85 or some such high number of different types of trees in a old english hedge, the sort that surronds a feild. I suppose htra tis the best old english hedges. agri rose macaskie.
 
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