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Rocks and soils on your farm - more about granite!

 
Posts: 132
Location: Maine, USA
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Hi

It seems people appreciated learning more about the rocks on their farm....so here is some more information granite - how it forms, and how it affects the soil.

http://www.almostafarmer.com/granite/

I hope people find this useful!

I will try and post more about different rock types over the next few weeks. Let me know what rock types you would like me to cover in this way.

Cheers

Gaz
www.almostafarmer.com
 
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How about pumice?
 
gardener
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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It says " many people add lime to counteract the low ph" I guess the opposite is true. I'm in limestone country and decomposed granite is often promoted for our soils.
 
Gary Lewis
Posts: 132
Location: Maine, USA
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wayne fajkus wrote:It says " many people add lime to counteract the low ph" I guess the opposite is true. I'm in limestone country and decomposed granite is often promoted for our soils.



I did not know that Thanks for sharing....it it would make total sense.

I am writing the section on limestone at the moment....so I will chase that concept up and see if I can find any research on it.

Gaz
www.almostafarmer.com


PS. I have been told on another forum that sharing my ideas and sharing what I know like I am is against their rules...gee I hope that is not the case here, cause all I want to do is share and help people out.
 
Gary Lewis
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Location: Maine, USA
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teresa quintero wrote:How about pumice?



Do you grow on pumice? Where are you to have that as a local stone?


Gaz
www.almostafarmer.com

 
teresa quintero
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My son lives in Bend Oregon where I visited him for a while. He said the ground was pumice. It did look more sandy than dirt. A river went by and
between the two (river and pumice) the area looked quite fertile. He said tho, that people imported dirt when planting lawns. It made me think the
pumice cut the roots maybe? Still I know the whole area I saw couldn't have been all imported dirt!
 
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