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Can spore slurry be used to introduce genetic variability?  RSS feed

 
dan long
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Obviously, I have a very limited understanding of how fungus behaves so bear with me if this is a dumb question

I understand that expanding mycelium can only be done so many times before it starts weakening from a lack of genetic diversity. Most labs get around this by freezing early generations and continuously expanding them, but im going for the lazy mans way.

If i have an outdoor mushroom bed that is well established I can use it to expand the patch a limited number of times. Id really like to get away with not creating new spawn every couple generations. If i were to pour spore slurry over the established patches, would those spores germinate and join novel DNA with the already established mycelium so that the mycelium wouldn't eventually die out from lack of genetic diversity?
 
John Elliott
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Dan, I see it's time we had that talk about the Boletes and the Russulas (that's Birds & Bees for those of you still stuck in the Animal Kingdom).

In the Fungal Kingdom, sex is much more logical than the Animal Kingdom. None of this growing up and puberty and something as ridiculous as "sexual maturity". Fungi can't be waiting around to grow and then have sex, the environment might dry out and then they would have to go back to being spores again. Spores are ready to swap DNA as soon as they germinate, in fact, the sooner the better. As soon as the spore has come out of dormancy and extended a few cells of hyphae, it's party time! Time to pair up with the nearest available partner and compare DNAs, see what genetic variability can be introduced into the next generation.

So the answer to your question is yes, new spores are always welcome. As soon as they germinate, they may have a gene that works particularly well for the piece of lignin they are sitting on. In that case, that gene is going to be very useful and that newly emerged piece of hyphae is going to be prime mating material. Its daughter cells will be in a good position to increase their representation in the colony.
 
dan long
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John Elliott wrote:Dan, I see it's time we had that talk about the Boletes and the Russulas (that's Birds & Bees for those of you still stuck in the Animal Kingdom).

In the Fungal Kingdom, sex is much more logical than the Animal Kingdom. None of this growing up and puberty and something as ridiculous as "sexual maturity". Fungi can't be waiting around to grow and then have sex, the environment might dry out and then they would have to go back to being spores again. Spores are ready to swap DNA as soon as they germinate, in fact, the sooner the better. As soon as the spore has come out of dormancy and extended a few cells of hyphae, it's party time! Time to pair up with the nearest available partner and compare DNAs, see what genetic variability can be introduced into the next generation.

So the answer to your question is yes, new spores are always welcome. As soon as they germinate, they may have a gene that works particularly well for the piece of lignin they are sitting on. In that case, that gene is going to be very useful and that newly emerged piece of hyphae is going to be prime mating material. Its daughter cells will be in a good position to increase their representation in the colony.


Never a dull post from you, John Elliot!

I noticed that a disproportionate number of threads on the fungus board are from me. Is there a way to delete threads after my question has been answered?
 
Burra Maluca
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dan long wrote:
I noticed that a disproportionate number of threads on the fungus board are from me. Is there a way to delete threads after my question has been answered?


Noooo! We want them to stay there so that all the other people who have the same question but are too shy to post can find it and benefit from the answer.

You didn't think you were the only one with questions, did you?
 
dan long
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Burra Maluca wrote:
dan long wrote:
I noticed that a disproportionate number of threads on the fungus board are from me. Is there a way to delete threads after my question has been answered?


Noooo! We want them to stay there so that all the other people who have the same question but are too shy to post can find it and benefit from the answer.

You didn't think you were the only one with questions, did you?


*wheew* glad its appreciated rather than frowned upon! I'd hate to be "that guy".
 
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