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Where is the fungal component of the native plant movement?

 
pioneer
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Location: SF Bay, California Zone 10b
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Something that's becoming increasingly mainstream is the idea that we should plant native plants. What exactly constitutes a "native" plant can be debated, but in general I think it's a good trend - if we can get people to avoid super aggressive species like English Ivy and Pampas grass then I'm cool with it. But something I don't really hear about is the idea of planting native fungi.

The closest I've seen is the popularity of wine cap fungus. It is native to North America, so in that sense it's native. But NA is a big place, and surely there must be local mushrooms for each region that would benefit the local fauna more if they had more opportunities to grow.

So is anyone doing research into the idea of native/local fungus to grow in specific regions? Are there native plant guilds that incorporate specific mushroom types? Or am I overthinking it?
 
pollinator
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We have native mushroom enthusiasts in NZ, who work hard to get people to "plant" native fungi instead of imported ones by selling spore culture and inoculated spawn. My own experience is definitely making me lean toward cultivation of natives, since they are so well adapted to the conditions and therefore easy to establish.
 
pollinator
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Join a local mushroom foraging group, whatever you find nearby that is native/naturalized, would be a great addition to your food forest.

But here is my shortlist:
Chicken of the Woods
Chanterelle
Morel Mushrooms
Black Trumpet
Lion’s Mane
Giant PuffBall
Shaggy Inkcap*
Field Mushroom (Agaricus campestris)
Hedgehog Mushroom (Hydnum repandum)
Fairy Ring Mushroom (Marasmius oreades)

I also think that you can widen the list by including medicinal mushrooms, or even more if you include just support species fungi, that doesn't have macroscopic fruiting bodies, but are immensely wonderful for the plants and soil.
 
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Location: South Louisiana, 9A
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One limiting factor here is we know so little about fungal diversity and native distributions. Yes, we know the edibles and where they're from. But there may be 4 million undescribed / unknown fungal species. It's hard to cultivate things you don't know exist. Given so many unknowns, it makes sense to me to simply create conditions in which fungi thrive and assume you'll have natives.
 
pollinator
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Oysters are about the only native fungus I can easily buy spores for, I'm not sure if the oysters I can buy are the same as the ones that grow around here though. I've got a few native mushrooms on the property only two of which are edible one is not worth eating and the other is restricted to growing only on elder (I have seen it on rowan as well once) Most mushrooms are very picky about where and what they grow on, so the ones you see all the time like winecaps are an exception, they will grow on many different things, are easy to grow and taste ok.

Every time I pick chanterelles I leave all the tops and waste under my big beach tree, it already has two other native mushrooms there that grow with chanterelles so I live in hope. there was a lovely thread here on Parasol mushrooms Establishing a garden patch of parasol mushrooms and Richards successful attempt to "transplant" them. Now I know where some grow on a roadside verge not very far from me and I have exactly the same conditions here so this year I will try and make a mushroom slurry and introduce them. But of course that means I have to find the mushrooms first it's not as easy as going online and ordering some spawn.
 
Malek Ascha
pioneer
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Looking for local foraging groups is a great idea. I think Jake is right - there's so much going on, including with nonfruiting mushrooms, that we just don't know.
 
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