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Permaculture on a hill  RSS feed

 
James Dotson
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I would like it if someone could help me with advice on using/applying permaculture techniques on a hill. I would say that the grade is about 25% to about 30% if I had to guess. It is facing east west and there is ample sunlight for the garden area. I would have to say also that there is a decent about of area to garden here. I just moved here and my girlfriend and I are hoping to transform her mothers property with permaculture practices. but the hill has me stumped slightly. I want to use swells ultimately because terraces would be to time consuming and financially too much, I think. I am willing to submit pictures to someone if they think they can really help me out. I don't have a fear of anything growing here, I just want to use the best methods for this slant. I love permaculture and hope to learn more about it but for now, I'm having a little bit of trouble wondering what is the best thing to do. my email is jgd014wvup@gmail.com On Facebook you can search for James Dotson and find me. you will see a picture of a little boy in a t-ball outfit. Its a picture of me when I was a kid. If anyone would like to help me or has any advice. I will try and check this forum in a few days in case of replies.

Thank you,

James
 
Miles Flansburg
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Howdy James, welcome to permies!

I think there are lots of people here at permies who would love to help you figure this out. There are actually a couple of other threads about doing just what you are thinking about.

Like this one... http://www.permies.com/t/38449/projects/steep-backyard-garden-WIP-input

A picture would really help get things started if you would have a couple to post. Thanks!
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
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Location: South West France
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James, you have to tell us a lot more about your hill before anyone can give you advice.

I have a hill too and it's a wonderful asset if you plan things well.

Where does your water come from ?
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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First, what's your location?

Second, the rule of thumb is you can have a crop garden if the slope is 0-2%. 3-18% can be productive trees. >18% left as natural forest.

Focus on the areas that are 3-18% but even those can be very steep to work in. Are there existing paths?
 
James Dotson
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Sorry for the late reply. This is our garden. This pic is about two weeks old. we have much more leaf coverage now. I had a soil test done and the ph was at 6.6. We are a little low in potassium. We think we are doing everything right so far. We moved here from Clearwater,fl to help out my girfriends mother. She works two jobs. We have been interested in living a more natural and sustainable life for some time. And now we have four acres to do it on. This is Blairsville, GA
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Cj Sloane
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In the top pic the garden looks like it's above the pond, but the 2nd pic look like it's below it - which would be great for syphoning water from the pond to the garden - along swales, ideally.

It does look flat enough, especially if you have raised beds on contour. geoff lawton has a great vid on gardens in different climates. I'll see if I can find it...


Here's a link to the vid on his site. Watch them all, but this one in particular.
 
James Dotson
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Cj Verde wrote:In the top pic the garden looks like it's above the pond, but the 2nd pic look like it's below it - which would be great for syphoning water from the pond to the garden - along swales, ideally.

It does look flat enough, especially if you have raised beds on contour. Geoff Lawton has a great vid on gardens in different climates. I'll see if I can find it...


Thank you!
 
Peter Ellis
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Couple of questions. The two pictures- place them side by side for a full view of the garden and pond, right?
Is it really running at a 25 percent slope? Does not look nearly that steep in the picture.
Soil texture? Georgia clay or something else?
Looks to me like a fine spot for a kitchen garden.
Last question for now, what are the length and width of the garden? No scale to the picture
 
Irene Kightley
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James, there may be a few ideas in these photos here that can help you plan your design.

Our slope is between 11° and 35° depending on the part you take into consideration.

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/hardworkinghippy/sets/72157624584423250/
 
James Dotson
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It is Georgia Clay. But yes those pictures are a full view placed back to back. I will have to get some updated pictures. but it will be, for the first year, a large rectangle of growing area. I know that as the cardboard was placed over the months, many insects were throughout the garden. The pH of the soil is good. if you are looking at the pond, that is south. That part of the acreage/the garden area gets great sunlight throughout the day. We hope to implement key hole gardens, guilds, mono-cultures and such. This is my first time applying permaculture in a real world setting. I think we are headed in the right direction.
 
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