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Marjory Wildcraft

 
Cassie Langstraat
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Marjory Wildcraft is often referred to as "The Martha Stewart of Self-Reliance". She had a revelation a while ago when she found out that there wasn't enough local food being grown in her area to provide veggies for one single small elementary school. This realization caused her to completely change her life and career. She is now dedicated to teaching people how to grow their own food, heal themselves with their own medicines, and prepare for collapse.

Her most popular resource is a 2 DVD set about how to Grow Your Own Groceries and they have been a hit all over the world.

UPDATE! Marjory loves us SO much that she is giving all permies 10% her Grow Your Own Groceries DVDs! Click HERE to check them out!



Another awesome creation she put out is the FREE Homemade Shampoo Ebook.



Marjory's main website is growyourowngroceries.org and there are tons of valuable blogs and articles on various subjects such as livestock, wild food, permaculture, and economics.



Not only does she produce all of this amazing content, but she is so passionate about these topics that she has been on over 2,500 radio, podcast, print, and television shows!



AND she visited Paul while she was in Montana and they recorded some video that will probably come out in a few months!.
 
Tina Paxton
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Wow! Thanks for sharing this! I've never heard of Marjory but love her mission and look forward to learning from her!
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Yeah! I have been exchanging emails with her the past couple weeks and she is truly a gem. I just got my homemade shampoo ebook the other day and am looking forward to reading it.
 
Tina Paxton
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:Yeah! I have been exchanging emails with her the past couple weeks and she is truly a gem. I just got my homemade shampoo ebook the other day and am looking forward to reading it.


I'll be downloading that tonight on my home computer. Looking forward to reading it. I'm trying to remove toxins from my diet and my hygiene care so this is right up my alley. I'm listening to her youtube videos now while I work...enjoying them very much.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Yeah I shaved my head in January so I haven't had to use any hair care products since then AT ALL up until about a month ago and now I am growing my hair back out and am like ughhh, I have to deal with all this shit again?! So I am sort of trying to make it better this time around.
 
Tina Paxton
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:Yeah I shaved my head in January so I haven't had to use any hair care products since then AT ALL up until about a month ago and now I am growing my hair back out and am like ughhh, I have to deal with all this shit again?! So I am sort of trying to make it better this time around.


LOL, I've not shaved my head but I do headcover (cover my hair in public) so I don't have to wash it as often... I just started headcovering and before then I kept my hair short because it is so thin and fine. Now that I don't wash it with commercial shampoo as often, it is getting thicker... I'm letting it grow out as well.

I have also stopped using commercial toothpaste. I mix baking soda and coconut oil and use that.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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It really is getting thicker?! Before I shaved my head, my hair was down to the middle of my back and it was soooo thin and stringy.. It was part of why I shaved it. I was sick of complaining about it without doing something about it. Anyway, what do you use to wash your hair now?
 
Tina Paxton
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:It really is getting thicker?! Before I shaved my head, my hair was down to the middle of my back and it was soooo thin and stringy.. It was part of why I shaved it. I was sick of complaining about it without doing something about it. Anyway, what do you use to wash your hair now?


It is getting thicker but I'm not sure if it is due to less washing (I'm still using commercial shampoo...different brands), to less brushing, to not being able to pull at it in frustration when I'm stressed (which is often), or due to the diet change (I went Paleo-AIP in March of this year) or a combination of all of those. But, definitely, it is thicker. I suspect that being able to find a good natural shampoo routine will help with the condition of my hair plus the condition of the scalp and area around my ears (psoriasis).
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Gotcha. Well regardless, it can't hurt it to try using non commercial shampoo.
 
Tina Paxton
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:Gotcha. Well regardless, it can't hurt it to try using non commercial shampoo.


Oh, I think it is definitely important to switch to non-commercial shampoo. I feel strongly that we must must must reduce our chemical exposure. I don't think we can completely avoid exposure to chemicals but where we can, we should so as to reduce the overall load on our internal detox systems.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Marjory just released this video about how to grow a chocolate tree in greenhouses in colder climates in northern america!

 
Derrick Gunther
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As far as how far north you can grow them, the Phipps Conservatory in Pittsburgh has an abundantly fruiting Cacao tree in a climate controlled greenhouse, which I'm fairly certain doesn't have supplemental light. So that's a bit further north than D.C. (40 degrees North latitude). Being an understory tree I'd image low light in north latitudes may not pose much of a problem, though short winter photo period might.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Nice! That is so neat. I wish we could know whether the one in alaska survived.
 
Pauli Muukkonen
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Helsinki Universitys Botanical Garden has cacao trees growing and fruiting in 60N latitude.
http://www.luomus.fi/fi/kaisaniemen-kasvitieteellinen-puutarha
Have to ask next time I visit if anyone is making cacao from those
 
Cassie Langstraat
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While this isn't specifically Marjory's writing, it came through her newsletter so I am posting it to her thread.

8 Uses of Wood Ash

Here is a little sneak peak of the list:

"1. You can make a dustbath area in the henhouse for the hens. They love it and it keeps the mites off them, as well as providing needed minerals . They will not be losing feathers due to mites or mineral deficiency.

2. You can use the finely sifted ash to keep bugs off your garden plants. It also adds minerals to the plants .

3. Sprinkle some around the tomatoes to keep cutworms away.

4 Filter the ash by pouring water through the ash and straw and collect it in a bucket. This can be added to oil or many different fats to make lye soap. You can add sage, rosemary, mint or lavender to make different soaps."

 
David Goodman
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Marjory is awesome. I just wanted to stop in and say that.
 
Len Ovens
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Cassie Langstraat wrote:While this isn't specifically Marjory's writing, it came through her newsletter so I am posting it to her thread.

8 Uses of Wood Ash



There are two baking uses I can think of off the top of my head:

The really clean, white, fluffy stuff, can be used for making biscuits. In place of baking soda/powder, use a table spoon of ash. Must mix quick and bake as this is not two stage as the baking powder is. It only rises once. Soda has really changed our lives Quick breads are not only quick to make, but should be eaten before they cool as they go "stale" (hard and tasteless) almost as fast. Most things called quick "bread" are actually cake as they have eggs and other stuff in them. At least the makers of "real Irish soda bread" seem to feel that way. Some kinds of rye bread are supposed to taste best if not eaten till at least three days after baking on the other hand.

The other use is in making bagels... boiled, fried and baked... the process is beyond me, but the old method involved lye from ashes.

And yes, Len reads way too much.
 
brad roon
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i've spent ten years in WVa with 53 species of hardwood trees on my former 40.81 acres. No electricity at all, so every morning the better half went to a fortune 300 Department of Energy Contractor in the HR dept.
She needed ironed clothes. Every work day at 5:00 am - light the woodstove in the kitchen and heat the sad irons. Her clothes would be out and i'd iron them and get her up and then do manly homesteading stuff. In a manly manner.

The books of the time all said specifically to use hardwood ashes for making lye for soaps or whatever. (sprinkle ashes into a greasy pan and use them as an initial cleaning of the dish/pan.)

Out here in Calif we have some hardwoods, but mostly pine and soft hardwoods. i looked up the difference in ash and for all those uses that i can figure out, the softwood ashes are similar or the same in function - it just takes more wood to make them. When you have hickory air dried to 72# -76# per cubic foot, that makes a lot more ash than ponderosa at it's what - 20+ - 30#/cubic foot? Going to take over 3 times more wood to get the ash.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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GOOD NEWS! Marjory Wildcraft is giving us (permies.com peeps) a sweet deal for the next 4 days!

50% Off Her Grow Your Own Groceries DVDs!

Thanks Marjory.

 
Juan Sebastian Estrada
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Is there a streaming or downloadable version?
 
Cassie Langstraat
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I don't think so at this point.. :/ I'm not 100% sure though.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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ooh! Forgot to mention that the dvd comes with all of this stuff:

*Bonus 1: Free Food: How To Make Acorns Taste Delicious

If you have an oak tree in your yard (or even in a nearby park) then you’ve got a super easy and tasty food source. Acorns were a staple of Native Americans in every region where they grew. They are highly nutritious calories. I absolutely love acorn pancakes!

*Bonus 2: How To Tan A Rabbit Hide

This e-book shows you a simple hair-on method for making luxurious, soft, rabbit furs.

*Bonus 3: Free Fertilizers

5 different methods of home composting so you can make free fertilizers from scraps, waste, worms, and even garbage.

*Bonus 4: Companion Planting

Quickly see what to plant together to get bigger, healthier, fruits and vegetables. Includes charts, tables, and scientific explanations for why they work so well.

*Bonus 5: Seed Saving Book

Never have to buy seeds again. Plus you can breed your own special varieties of vegetables. This book will get you started.

In this powerful video training course you'll learn the fastest, easiest, and most fun ways to grow your own food organically, sustainably, and off-grid.

WHEH!


Click Here to get 50% off the DVDs AND all those bonuses!
 
Jan Cooper
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More here about growing cocoa in containers-  

How to process cocoa- 
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