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Challenge: Starting permaculture systems on schist in eastern Quebec (3b)  RSS feed

 
Heidi Hoff
Posts: 127
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Bonjour Isabelle!

I've been following your progress, too, and was pleased to see someone undertaking a largish-scale project in our area. Spring seems to want to come very late this year, but I'll be eager to see what this new season brings for your land.

I noticed that you planted some nuts last year. (By the way, where did you get your nuts?) I'm looking forward to hearing about your success!

My dad, on his farm in Wisconsin, collected black walnuts from his own woods and planted them in his fields. The squirrels ate most of them the first year, even though they were buried several inches deep. The next year he got some fresh cow manure from his neighbor and put a shovelful on top of each walnut immediately after planting. MUCH better success rate! It kept the squirrels away and gave the trees a shot of nitrogen when they sprouted in the spring. Those trees are now about 20 or 30 feet tall. He kept them well pruned for the first few years. If we manage to keep the farm in the family, they'll make some fine lumber for my nieces and nephews (or their kids).


 
Isabelle Gendron
Posts: 173
Location: Montmagny, Québec, Canada (zone 4b)
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Hey Heidi! Good morning

yes spring is slow to arrive. I'm really starting to walk on the wall here :p I want to work in the agrden and instead, we keep having snow. ANother 15 cm yeasterday on top of everything that fall this winter.

Actually, I planted red oak nuts and ¨marronnier d'Inde¨. Not really edible but in Herborisetrie, I can use the Walnut....it is a friend of mine that have some. She gave me full boxes. Still have so much...too much. If you pass by and want some it will be my pleasure to give you some. For now I have some nut in the fridge and in the barn....I sew (sow) 200 last fall. I have put a protection on top but I guess squirrels will have get some...we will see soon. But thanks for the manure tips, I will try that next fall.

I was supposed to have a project with Mr Blais from les Noix du QUébec last fall. But where he wanted to plant the trees, it was almost impossible for me to prepare the land last fall, with the vines and the garden and most of all, the impossibilities to bring the tractore over there. I will try to do something this year. He has principaly Hazelnut from another variety wich the fruits are bigger and so easier to broke. I will try to find some. He did a lot of experiment and notice that for now, the easiest way to grow them was from the nuts instead of grafting. The grafts seems to tend to broke with time.

This year I enlarge the garden, finish a food forest section near the vines and see for the rest.

Have a nice day

isabelle
 
Isabelle Gendron
Posts: 173
Location: Montmagny, Québec, Canada (zone 4b)
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Ho and Heidi,

For once we have an advantage of having North facing land. The nut trees (at least hazelnut) tend to appreciate more North face. it helps late blooming and minimize early flowering to have them freeze later...short said but I guess you get the point.

Isabelle
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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