• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

How do communities tackle problems arising from medical insurance or lack thereof?

 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
255
forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't think medical language is such a great barrier. They follow a simple formula using two well documented dead languages. In our age of open information it is easy to research anything you are told. Doing so is good sense and can easily be life saving.

I'm also going to point out that my mother went through a period where her hands hurt so much that she couldn't pick things up. The doctor did not diagnose her with arthritis. In fact, he couldn't find any diagnosis that fit. She hunted down both the cause and the treatment herself.

I also hunted down an effective treatment for myself that far surpassed the antibiotic cream I was offered at the same office after a pot of boiling water poured down my front. My treatment was antibiotic, anti inflammatory, and got rid of the pain. The doctor's suggestion would have left me in pain and not done as much to speed healing.

Doctors may be invested in using the industrial medicine they mortgage their youth to learn. I don't think they are purposely trying to make good health care indecipherable as some method of controlling easily intimidated patients. Their very technical terms for problems allows them to have precision in their diagnosis. An accurate diagnosis usually gives me enough information to find a healthy alternative treatment.
 
Posts: 79
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good food, exercise, water, and proper sleep will take care of most things.

But every once in a while someone breaks a finger. (Or gets an infection that won't go away, sorry berberine)

I've been contemplating this question, and (as a US citizen who does NOT have health insurance - currently illegal) have had to visit the doctor a couple times in the two years since my care was dropped. In the US there are many urgent care clinics popping up. I can usually see a doctor for $100-$150, and medications (like steriods for a serious case of poison ivy) cost between $4-$27. I make about half the federal poverty line. I do not use entitlements, and make sure I have an emergency fund to cover events like these.

However, creating a basic safety net would be nice. I recently took a regenerative livelihood course through Gaia "U", and one of their more interesting systems was "Income Solidarity." It established a baseline income, and, depending on your monthly income above or below the line, at a percentage of your choosing (you can choose to be "IN" for a lot (10%+) or just try it out (1%)) you either contribute to the general fund or draw from it. Eventually over a decade they had a running surplus, which members could drawn out an interest-free loan in the event of major crisis or opportunity.

This could be a great system for community supported health care. There are many variables - trust between members being a huge one - and it would take time to establish. There is big potential here.
 
Come have lunch with me Arthur. Adventure will follow. This tiny ad:
Learn Permaculture through a little hard work
https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic