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I just discovered giant hogweed on my property. I will completely eradicate it.

 
gardener
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This is a very valuable discussion.  Great ideas, Queenie. You have my head spinning. Thanks for hints of perspective and help to avoid extreme damage Valerie.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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It occurred to me after I posted these photos it seems as if I am standing right in the middle of it.  I didn't intend to give that impression.  I avoid all contact with this plant in every case.

A little scene occurred while I was cutting some down the other day I thought I would share with you here --

    The turkey came back to her nest. I know this because I startled her off her nest again this morning.
    So I avoided the area and while driving away slowed down to see if I could spot her nest from the road. She was back! Again! And obliged me with a stirring so I could tell. I will avoid her now and eagerly await the hatching.

She had built her nest in the shelter of the huge plants.  So, there, perhaps some will see some justification in allowing it to grow but I maintain that the turkeys would find some other sheltering area if the giant hogweed were not there.

... Anyone know how long turkeys incubate?
 
pollinator
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25-31 days. http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/wild-turkey
 
pollinator
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Location: Omaha, NE
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I feel the need to chime in on this conversation to say that the band Genesis recorded a song called "The Return of the Giant Hogweed." Here is the recording where you can make out the lyrics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTuJQL8GBqY And an entertaining live performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDwyBWjfFaM
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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Thank you.  I had no idea...   smh
 
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Location: Ashland, WI
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This plant has recently made its way into Eastern Wisconsin, and folks are understandably concerned. The USDA maps have not been updated yet, and I'm not sure if it was a localized problem or if it has spread further into the state.

One thing to keep in mind with a plant as dangerous as Giant Hogweed is that not dealing with it could open one up to a legal liability risk as this stuff makes a real bad Poison Ivy infection seem like a cakewalk.
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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I go out every morning (I don't live there.  Yet) now that the seed heads are ripening and cut them down so that the seeds can be collected and destroyed.  Our local DEC dept. is assisting with this.

I saw 4 baby turkeys (yeah, I know - poults) the other day so they've successfully hatched!  At least some of them did.  They were with about 4 adults and one of them was a tom so they have their own little clan.
 
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I cut it down and had a fire on the spot. This appears to have been successful.
.......
People are free to decide what to grow on their land. With a few exception for endangered species comma we are also free to decide what not to grow.

As stated before, I would go to some lengths to eradicate English ivy, bindweed, gorse and other plants that would make portions of my property completely useless or economically useless.

There are many plants that won't actually harm people or wildlife, that I still will not accept. If English ivy were to become well-established on my property, this would make the production of most useful plants much more difficult. It wouldn't be worth growing most of the things that I want to have. I have an ad that I run occasionally on Used Victoria. I offer to eradicate English ivy for the low low price of $50,000 per acre. I'm not kidding about this. I have done some very small eradications for customers, and that's about what it costs on a per acre basis.
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