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Dirt cheap, all seasons, land

 
Posts: 2
Location: Fairview, United States
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http://landcentral.com/land-for-sale/utah/private-acreage-near-beryl-junction-utahmore cheap land
this is another cheap piece of ground we looked at in Utah
 
Posts: 57
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In coconino county if the treasurer sells you the land its yours. I believe I've left a link previously so you xan see its location and the innumerable tax defaults, it may take a little research to find which are under three years , and thus reclaimable by its original owner, and which are for sale by treasurer..but given its undesirable nature id think it rare someone would pay up to reclaim it. (Considering it a popluar landscam area, 121$down and 121$/mon till the 7k is paid off at 10% int, yeah not sering someone coming back to grab it) I met someone,who was born in the Grand canyon...and he informed me there is a clay layer about 3-5'down. He says the biggest 'whiteman'blunder is they try to dig a well too deep, puncturing the clay layer which allows the trapped water to drain. (Yes he is a local indian) There are hundreds of acres at about an acre and a qtr available. Most in tax deliquientcy. Due dilligemce should yield you a property in the 300-700$/1.25 acre range. Thats fairly cheap...and i am really looking forward to shareing this with likeminded people. Especially since i have this nagging feeling that the country and the world are reaching ctitical mass... far enough away to be safe and close enough to enjoy city life occasionally. I cant find a better suited area for permaculturists talants
.not yet. Lol....btw law enforcement responds only to neighbor complaints or extreme dumbasses...so if enough permies are there i think it could be awesome
 
Ryan Tollmann
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You dont need my permission,  i dont sell the land, contact the treasurer or vist in person, flagstaff is a tolerant nice community...from what ive seen so far. But then im a middle-aged white male, i wouldnt know prejudice if it bit me on my ass.
 
gardener
Posts: 1813
Location: Zone 6b
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Trebizond date (Elaeagnus angustifolia var. orientalis), a variety of Russian olive sold in markets of Turkey and Iran. The drupaceous, datelike fruits have a dry, mealy mesocarp, and a shiny, brownish-yellow outer skin (exocarp). Mealy particles from the mesocarp are visible as white flecks in this photograph. The cylindrical pits (endocarps) resemble those of date palms. Like dates, the fruits are eaten fresh and dried.

https://greenwoodnursery.com/search-page?keys=Elaeagnus+angustifolia&=%EF%80%82  they sell the Russian olives, not sure this is orientalis.

There is a persimmon called trebizond date also.
turkey1b.jpg
[Thumbnail for turkey1b.jpg]
 
Posts: 40
Location: South-central Iowa
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If you're looking for climate data the Western Regional Climate Center is the place to go. Obviously in the West microclimates vary considerably over short distances but you can get an idea anyway. Valle AP only has 12 years of data (instead of perhaps 112 yrs) but here's the link to check it out: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?az9007. To see AZ at large and check out other stations in the area click this: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/summary/Climsmaz.html. And for all the US find a nearby weather station here: http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/coopmap/. Once you learn to navigate the data you can find elevation, avg frost-free season, growing degree days, extreme min/max, etc, etc, etc.

Here's what I gathered: 6000' elev, 9.4" precip (~15" as snow), Jan avg=46F/17F, Jul avg=88F/52F, 2334 GDD, absolute MIN = -22F (but that only includes 3 yrs data), absolute MAX = 97F (3 yrs data). Unfortunately, the Valle zip code also covers Williams, AZ (30 miles south) so I don't get accurate readings when I plug in zip 86046 into http://www.plantmaps.com/index.php (my other goto climate site). Williams has similar temp regimes but is 750' higher in elevation and gets double the precipitation so is in a very different microclimate. I would certainly expect my perennials to withstand zone 5 or less.

Lastly, a must-read if you're moving out there is Lisa Rayner's Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains - A guide to high altitude, semi-arid home permaculture gardens. It contains priceless info for anybody at elevation in the 4 corners states and the author is based in Flagstaff. Good luck!

Cheers!
 
Posts: 1
Location: Lebanon, United States
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Ryan, thank you for sharing! I'm an Arizona native, and have been longing to get back to the Southwest.
This is exciting.  My partner and I are definitely interested in this idea.

Northern Arizona is where it's at as far as I'm concerned, but cost of land around Flagstaff can be quite costly. Flagstaff is a fantastic town!  Really progressive, it has it's own special flavor. It is a full service town, growing at a rapid rate. Lots of great live music, cultural events, exciting college town energy, great restaurants...  I hear Williams is getting more interesting as well. I haven't been to Valle except to pass through to the canyon, is that where that bizarre Flinstone place is?

I need to do some more research and look into the websites and info you have posted, but I wanted to reach out to let you know that two permies are excited about this prospect!

Thanks
Jackie
 
Ryan Tollmann
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Pete Casanova wrote:Ryan, I just tried to do a homestead thing. I crashed and burned for various and Sundry reasons. I think I'm tough enough to try again and I would really love to do it on a piece of ground next to someone else who is of like mind. I'm older than dirt but very healthy and I am hoping that this ground that you were talking about has no dirt bikes. on my piece of ground I have built solar panels by soldering together solar cells and I dug a hole 22 feet deep hoping to hit water with a post hole digger. I build rammed-earth walls out of discarded tires. I would like to know more about you and would like to let you know more about me. My wife wants me to let you know she is an artist and we love peace and quiet. one of the things I did on my piece of ground was create ponds with tarps and I was able to collect water from the rain. and yes we hauled our  water and know how to conserve.


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Its a big area. Just talked an inspector today seems some people are building without permits, I get the impression the drawback is it you want to sell the property. The county is lad back it seems.

 
Kirk Schonfeldt
Posts: 40
Location: South-central Iowa
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New Mexico AES released a cultivar of Trebizond Date 'King Red' some decades ago that would be worth locating. Also, look for Carpathian Walnut 'Mesa' which was released in NM and is more adapted to high desert sun than most cultivars. And, as I recall, Eleagnus sp. are resistant to the allelopathic chemicals walnuts produce (and fix N).
 
Ryan Tollmann
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Kirk Schonfeldt wrote:New Mexico AES released a cultivar of Trebizond Date 'King Red' some decades ago that would be worth locating. Also, look for Carpathian Walnut 'Mesa' which was released in NM and is more adapted to high desert sun than most cultivars. And, as I recall, Eleagnus sp. are resistant to the allelopathic chemicals walnuts produce (and fix N).





Thanks Kirk, I'll check that out.
 
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