• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Burra Maluca
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Daron Williams
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
  • Bryant RedHawk

Kyle's Projects & Adventures  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 220
Location: PNW
34
books food preservation homestead cooking tiny house trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great attitude!  I understand the hope and disappointment.  I have a handful of things that I'm hoping will be ripe and there when I visit my place in a couple weeks.  If I wait too long, the bear will get them.  if I go too early, they won't be ready.  And the dates are on the calendar now so... fingers crossed.

Looking forward to seeing pics of projects for next year.
 
gardener
Posts: 422
Location: Sierra Nevadas, CA 6400'
120
dog hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We're due for our first frost here in a couple of days, which as always means it's the most productive time of the year! The front-yard garden continues to produce tomatoes and the first tomatillos have started breaking through their casings.



Last weekend I had some friends up at the ranch, and I convinced them to harvest elderberries for with me. I ended up with a paper bag completely filled with berries at the end of it. Once they were picked, it was a little over a gallon and a half of berries.





My primary reason was to make elderberry syrup! I love semi-sweet syrups like this with a bit of butter on english muffins in the morning.



With the rest of the berries I'm attempting to make wine! Elderberries grow very well at the ranch if you can protect them from the cows. I hope to get better at making wine in the future, but for now this is a very rough recipe. I used to help my dad making beer eons ago, but since then I really haven't done anything fermented. I'm excited to see how it turns out — worst case, I'll have a bunch of vinegar to make in about a year.



As winter approaches, I've been trying to get better at indoor gardening. This batch of radish microgreens got a little leggy while we were away at the ranch, but I'm finally starting to get the hang of it. Radish, avocado, and seed salads (in this case, some old sliced almonds) are also some of my favorite snacks.



 
Kyle Neath
gardener
Posts: 422
Location: Sierra Nevadas, CA 6400'
120
dog hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, I have been incredibly busy with a lot of work I really don't enjoy: primarily paperwork. Hiring a new caregiver for my parents, getting my estate planning in order, and a lot of financial stuff that I dislike with a passion of a thousand suns, but will be great for future Kyle. I can't really explain why I hate this stuff so much, but it weighs heavily on my soul. But life also continues on. I've filled the parent's woodshed. Got some backpacking in with the girlfriend. And started to winterize the ranch.

The seasons continue to march on. The first ski area opened this weekend (Mt. Rose) and the distant high peaks have a dusting of snow that just won't go away. The aspens are doing their show-off thing again, and it's incredibly beautiful up here in the mountains.



Last weekend, we spent a night at 8,000ft and I can confirm it is getting quite cold. Our sleeping pad deflated half way through the night, but we did get a beautiful sunset. It ended up being so cold we shortened our trip from 3 days to 2 and hiked the remaining 14 miles or so back to the cars to avoid another cold night.

This weekend, I spent my time at the ranch getting everything all happy for winter times. Mostly this involved walking back and forth with something in my hand all day long. We usually get around 5-10ft of standing snow on the ground. Add in water and ice weight, and that means anything that can be crushed shall be if it's not put away (about 300-400psf). While I was doing this, I kept collecting cow shit. You know, for my garlic. Which I managed to plant in October this year! I am experimenting with 30" beds this year in an area of the garden. So I took the first bed and double-dug in about 10gallons of cow shit and planted around 64 garlics — just under 2lbs of seed. I wish I had counted better.

The shitty cows destroyed another apple tree. I guess the wire cages around the trees were too upsetting, so they just bulldozed through the whole thing and snapped the tree and t-posts flat to the ground. Can't wait to get a fence next year. It will be a priority for me. Probably hired out. I don't like building fences.

For all the complaining in this post, I'm super excited for the future. Some super exciting developments are underway for me personally, and even though I am suffering in paperwork much of it is of my own procrastinating doing. I should be done by October and ready to do just about anything I want in the world come November. Plus I am really excited about my garlic. I've never had animals (other than my dog & cats), so I've always had to rely on outside sources for my organic matter. This year, I've got a huge compost pile and about 20gals of raw manure dug into next year's garden beds. I spent the time to break up the ground, dig in organic matter, and only plant the largest cloves. Irrigation is ready for next year too. I have no idea what I would do with 64 heads of garlic, but that seems like a good problem. I celebrated with some green beans and (homegrown) garlic bread on the fire as celebration.
IMG_2152.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2152.jpeg]
Garlic
IMG_2157.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2157.jpeg]
The meadow at sunset (with apens poking out)
IMG_2146.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2146.jpeg]
High country in October
IMG_2154.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2154.jpeg]
Green beans & garlic bread
 
If you try to please everybody, your progress is limited by the noisiest fool. And this tiny ad:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!