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Sulphur smell in well water

 
Posts: 15
Location: Montana
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The Sulphur odor (hydrogen sulphide gas) can be treated with oxidation ( ozone, peroxide, chlorine...).  First make sure you have thoroughly chlorinated the system....maintain 200 ppm free chlorine for 24 hours.  Also slug the well with chlorinated water to force some treatment into the aquifer.  The last h2s system I did used an ozone unit.  Around $1500 IIRC.  
 
pollinator
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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What was different about your water supply such you did not have the build up of minerals nor the sulphur smell?
 
Scott Waterman
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Mineral scale in your plumbing system is a function of the background water chemistry which is altered by the pressure, temperature, and chemical changes (e.g. exposure to atmospheric oxygen) at the surface versus in the aquifer.   You will see rapid scaling a lot in water heaters where you are rapidly heating "hard" groundwater and precipitating calcium carbonate.  

The ozone system that I mentioned in the previous post was installed on a well in the lower Clark Fork River valley of SW Montana.  The groundwater had naturally occurring levels of arsenic (80 ppb), iron (2 ppm) and dissolved hydrogen sulfide gas that made it objectionable to use in a house, hence the treatment system.  The treatment train consisted of particulate filtration, softener (iron and manganese removal), arsenic removal unit, and ozone treatment for h2s removal.  This type of system costs about $3-4K and requires some regular operation and maintenance...and grid power.
 
John C Daley
pollinator
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Thanks, the link I provided earlier suggests just the use of peroxide to deal with the sulphur, but states not to use chlorine in that system.
Is there a specific reason for that , that you can think of, rather than unnecessary expense?
 
Scott Waterman
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You would probably liberate chlorine gas if you allowed dissolved hypochlorite to contact hydrogen peroxide.  I only use hypochlorite to temporarily disinfect a water system.  I have not seen any peroxide systems used for home treatment systems.  I have used it for insitu contaminant cleanup projects, but most have switched over to permanganates probably due to safer shipping and handling.  
 
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