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Need berry seeds, in Pakistan  RSS feed

 
Posts: 28
solar trees urban
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Hans Quistorff wrote:4 types of berry seeds wil be mailed tomorrow. They are all seeds that dried on the vine at the end of the growing season. Plant them in moist soil and see what will grow.



Hi,

Today, I sowed 3 out of 4 berries you sent me. Fingers are crossed.
I soaked the seeds overnight in warm-to-hot water with some vinegar (Acetic Acid).
Used a little extra manure than usual, in order to decrease the pH.

Now, let's see what happens.
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Loganberry, Raspberry, Boysenberry
 
pollinator
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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Be patient, they have very hard seed coats, designed to pass through bird digestion.
 
Zk Khalid
Posts: 28
solar trees urban
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Hans Quistorff wrote:Be patient, they have very hard seed coats, designed to pass through bird digestion.



Hmm. That's why I used the warm water water and vinegar. Will keep watering them twice a day to aid smooth germination.
 
Zk Khalid
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solar trees urban
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Hans Quistorff wrote:Be patient, they have very hard seed coats, designed to pass through bird digestion.



I'm quite excited to report that one (1) BoysenBerry seed has sprouted. In fact, it germinated a week ago, but I got the time today to report.
And in accordance with the theory that berry seeds are designed to be abused, I should mention that when I received the seeds BoysenBerry's pack was already open and roaming freely in the main envelope. They were possibly opened by the custom or other inspection department. But my point is that there abuse was started long before they reached me. And it's the only one that has sprouted so far.

There's another thing growing as well, I'm not sure if it's a weed or something useful.

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BoysenBerry Sprout
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The Other Thing
 
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Location: South of the the headwaters to the tributary at the final bend of the Monongahela River
bike forest garden trees
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Congratulations on a new sprout!
I live in Pittsburgh (US) where these plants are native and grow wild. As a food resource these patches must be maintained and taken care of to keep up production.
Unmanaged berry patches turn into thick thorny patches that are very difficult to manage or maintain, that will need cut to ground level to be properly set-up.
These are highly invasive plants, and can easily take over forests, any disturbed soil and turn them into unmanageable thorn beds.
With all that being said, these are my favorite types of fruit, and they are a wonderful addition to any garden or maintained environment.
I have a wild black raspberries patch that established in my parent's back yard that I started tending recently.
I'll be happy to mail some seeds to you if they actually produce good fruit.
Good luck getting your berry patch set-up!
 
Zk Khalid
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solar trees urban
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Donald Johnson wrote:Congratulations on a new sprout!
I live in Pittsburgh (US) where these plants are native and grow wild. As a food resource these patches must be maintained and taken care of to keep up production.
Unmanaged berry patches turn into thick thorny patches that are very difficult to manage or maintain, that will need cut to ground level to be properly set-up.
These are highly invasive plants, and can easily take over forests, any disturbed soil and turn them into unmanageable thorn beds.
With all that being said, these are my favorite types of fruit, and they are a wonderful addition to any garden or maintained environment.
I have a wild black raspberries patch that established in my parent's back yard that I started tending recently.
I'll be happy to mail some seeds to you if they actually produce good fruit.
Good luck getting your berry patch set-up!



Hmm. Sadly, that sprout wasn't berry even though it has a striking resemblance to berry leaves. Instead it was a weed, what is commonly known as Marijuana. I was so devastated to discover that I just didn't feel like posting here. I would love to try your seeds, may be they will do better. Should I send my postal address?
Meanwhile, I have planned to put the previous seeds in Refrigerator for a month or two for stratification process. Hopefully, that will make them sprout.

When everyone says that these things are wild, I think that the only problem should be getting them to sprout/germinate, afterwards it should do fine on its own.
 
Donald Johnson
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Location: South of the the headwaters to the tributary at the final bend of the Monongahela River
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That plant is still useful for removing certain types of soil contamination, as well as making rope, and waterproof resins.
As for the legalities, it could definitely cause problems in a lot of places.
It's probably already a widespread native plant already, since it likely first sprouted Somewhere in the western Himalaya mountain ranges.
Anyways, my black raspberries are growing and will be ready for a harvest in the next couple weeks.
Have you successfully sprouted any seeds from the mail?
If so, how where they packed and shipped to you?
 
Zk Khalid
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solar trees urban
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Donald Johnson wrote:That plant is still useful for removing certain types of soil contamination, as well as making rope, and waterproof resins.
As for the legalities, it could definitely cause problems in a lot of places.
It's probably already a widespread native plant already, since it likely first sprouted Somewhere in the western Himalaya mountain ranges.
Anyways, my black raspberries are growing and will be ready for a harvest in the next couple weeks.
Have you successfully sprouted any seeds from the mail?
If so, how where they packed and shipped to you?



No, I haven't been successful in sprouting any. Instead, like I said I will try to stratify them in the fridge.
The fruit was allowed to dry on the plant and then sent to me in regular post envelope.
 
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