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Screwed my soil by too much horse manure. What now?

 
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Trace Oswald wrote:

When I had a few plants I could never bring myself to cut them either.  The bumblebees just love the flowers.  My solution was to plant lots (and lots and lots) of them, and now I can cut them on a rotational basis so the bees always have some.

Thanks Trace! I do believe you've got the answer. I've been told that the area I live in is hard on bees, and I've also been told that comfrey can sometimes get out of hand and take over (even though I'm capable of killing it!) I can think of at least 3 more places I can plant some this week, so that will be step 1.
 
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Jay Angler wrote:Trace Oswald wrote:

When I had a few plants I could never bring myself to cut them either.  The bumblebees just love the flowers.  My solution was to plant lots (and lots and lots) of them, and now I can cut them on a rotational basis so the bees always have some.

Thanks Trace! I do believe you've got the answer. I've been told that the area I live in is hard on bees, and I've also been told that comfrey can sometimes get out of hand and take over (even though I'm capable of killing it!) I can think of at least 3 more places I can plant some this week, so that will be step 1.



As long as you don't plant common comfrey and use one of the bocking strains, it doesn't really spread.  Mine get quite big around, and it takes a number of years.  As the plant gets bigger and expands, the center dies off.  When that happens, I just break off a few pieces of root from the outside edges of the plant and plant them back in the center.  If you have one that just gets too large in any spot, you can build a hot compost pile on it to kill it, or just cut it off at the ground and cover it with plastic or rubber sheeting until it does.  The worst thing about comfrey is, it's addictive.  I love it so much I have quite literally hundreds of plants now.
 
pollinator
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I've got some comfrey coming and look what is said about comfrey as a companion plant in orchards:
https://wintercovefarm.com/comfrey-in-the-permaculture-orchard.
I'm getting ready to take some comfrey roots out of my garden: They grow a bit too big and very deep, so they are likely to be hard to remove, but I'll transplant as many as I can along with other companions arounds my fruit trees. I've been busy the last few days doing a little pruning and orchard cleaning! Can't wait to get started in earnest!
 
Whip out those weird instruments of science and probe away! I think it's a tiny ad:
Boost Egg Nutrition With This Organic Algae Poultry Supplement
https://permies.com/t/153700/Organic-Astaxanthin-Algae-Poultry-Supplement
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