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Cedar Heights Fireclay  RSS feed

 
Posts: 13
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Looking for fireclay for my RMH. Found a company that says they carry fireclay, but not Lincoln 60. Asked if it was actual fireclay or refractory mortar, they said it was a fireclay. Brand is Cedar Heights.

Anyone know anything about it? Is it suitable for use in the burn tunnel and heat riser?
 
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Location: near Houston, TX; zone 8b
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If this is premixed fireclay in a pail and it runs about $1/pound, here is what I know. We recommend it as a mortar for the joints between chimney flue liners and as a way to attach fireclay bricks to the sides of chimney flue liners. We tell our customers that the joints should be no thicker than 1/8"; any thicker and they will show cracks and leak air when they dry. It dries very hard and brittle.

It is also a conductive material like dense fireclay bricks.
 
gardener
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Location: Upstate NY, zone 5
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There are many varieties of fireclay with different characteristics. If this is "Cedar Heights Goldart", look at what Axner has to say about it:
http://www.axner.com/goldart.aspx

It appears to have a maximum working temperature around cone 12 (2400 F) which is just about suitable for firebox use, but would be vitrified and hard at that temp.

"Clay associated with the coal measures of the Carboniferous System of sedimentary rocks. A few deposits are residual clays similar to china clay. Fireclays are often refractory clays and are used for firebricks. The name gives this impression but there are fireclays which vitrify below 1300°C (2372°F). These are used for drainage pipes, building bricks, sanitary ware and stoneware. Grog is usually fired and ground fireclay."
-The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques
 
N. Taylor
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Glenn Herbert wrote:It appears to have a maximum working temperature around cone 12 (2400 F) which is just about suitable for firebox use, but would be vitrified and hard at that temp.



"just about suitable"? So, it wouldn't work? But, doesn't lincoln 60 (which seems to be a fireclay of choice for RMH build) vitrify at cone 10?

http://shop.clay-planet.com/clay-fire---lincoln-60.aspx
 
Glenn Herbert
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If it has similar characteristics to lincoln 60 it should be fine.
 
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