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Bindweed a problem?  RSS feed

 
Tim Wells
Posts: 119
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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Bindweed Convolvulus arvensis is everywhere on my allotment. It produces a thick mat over the ground and improves the soil as it spreads. However it also climbs up and smothers my crops by august. It sets seed and finishes by late Sept. I have hoed the dried haulms and planted Fava beans (Broad beans) and have perennial potatoes, hoping that I will get the June July crop before bindweed comes back in force. Or should I just deep mulch the bindweed to improve the soil so the compacted poor conditions it thrives in are no longer present?
 
Charli Wilson
Posts: 296
Location: Derbyshire, UK
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cat chicken urban
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Plenty of the stuff on my allotment too! I don't like to leave it to grow rampantly- it seems to grow too fast and strangle things, and my neighbouring allotmenteers don't really appreciate it.

Sheet mulching with cardboard let it spread- it just spread underneath the cardboard and compost and woodchips and sprouted all over the place. Putting down plastic sheeting for a longer period beat it though. It still lives between my raspberries and stuff, but in manageable small amounts.
 
Konstantinos Karoubas
pollinator
Posts: 309
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A similar issue was discussed in this thread.

http://www.permies.com/t/14563/plants/bindweed-quackgrass-holding

There is a reason for everything.

Kostas
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1275
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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I've been pulling it when it sprouts on my berms. I'd originally been leaving it but when I noticed it choking my trees I started ripping it out. I go out weekly and pull it up now.
 
Tim Wells
Posts: 119
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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I have hard pan as it's a over-cultivated allotment site. I have to hoe weekly to stop the bindweed overtaking.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6155
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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If you take steps to improve your mineral situation, and pH, the weed will be less problematic. We have acidic soil here. The addition of lime helps.

If you have it, give it something to climb. It will climb a nice stake rather than going for your crops. A thick bunch on a stake, is easily pulled. The roots are everywhere, so chop and drop does no harm.
 
Tim Wells
Posts: 119
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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I have mulched with seaweed and autumn tree debris. Planted globe artichoke, rhubarb, comfrey, horseradish and mint to replace the bindweed's deep root function.
Its easier to hoe early than let it grow and pull, as it can get quite tough like string. Pull/ hoe and drop early is the one I think, while the soil comes back to health.
 
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