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Sepp Holzer's marketing

 
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Does anyone know how Sepp markets his products? Retail, wholesale, through a co-op, a downtown market, his neighbors???

If he explains this in his books, I haven't read them yet.
 
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From what I remember in the podcasts, he doesn't sell anything. To avoid all the bizarre regulations and frustrations of expensive licenses, he charges a feet to come onto the property. While there, you are free to gather up whatever you like to take home with you. That can mean baskets of produce or nothing at all. In much the same way some prohibition era locations would sell something unrelated and offer a free drink with every purchase, so too does Sepp do. At least as I understood it.
 
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I'm not sure that his system exists solely to dodge regulations. It's also a great time saver. No packing everything into the truck and spending the day at the farmers market. Customers harvest and haul their produce. I've seen several bed and breakfasts that grow lots of food that is eaten on site. It's efficient.
 
D. Logan
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Dale Hodgins wrote:I'm not sure that his system exists solely to dodge regulations. It's also a great time saver. No packing everything into the truck and spending the day at the farmers market. Customers harvest and haul their produce. I've seen several bed and breakfasts that grow lots of food that is eaten on site. It's efficient.



I don't doubt that is true too. The podcast in question didn't mention any of his other reasons though. It just brought up how it allows for avoiding a lot of big-ag favoring rules. It has all the benefits of a U-pick farm without the regulations imposed on them.
 
Curtis Budka
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Thanks, its an interesting concept, which is pretty much what you can expect from Sepp. Does anyone know how the rules he has to follow in Austria compare to the rules in a state that would be considered anti permaculture/organicness?
 
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