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PEP1 - Food Preparation  RSS feed

 
D. Logan
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This probably seems like a lot, but a lot of this stuff is fundamental for most people who like doing cooking. I incorperated in information put forward in the other thread, but if I missed something, add it to the list.

white belt:

- Demonstrate an understanding of volumetric measurements, weight measurement and when each is most effectively used.
- Demonstrate knowledge of the safe cooking temperatures as indicated by a thermometer.
- Demonstrate knowledge of what various levels of doneness on meats indicates.
- Identify the primary variations on knives and what each is best for.
- Demonstrate the proper pealing and paring techniques
- Peal 100 pounds of vegetables (cumulative)
- Demonstrate how to sharpen and maintain a set of high quality knives.
- Demonstrate competence in the common slicing methods, producing 10 pounds for each of the following (squared, brunoise dice, large dice, medium dice, small dice, slice, juliene, baton, batonnet, paysanne, chiffonade, and mince)
- Explain the use of skillets, saucepans, woks, grills, griddles, steamers, double boilers, stockpots, crepe pans,
- Maintain a safe set of cutting boards, including at least one block cutting board.
- Butcher a small animal from the land. (Chicken, duck, rabbit, etc)
- Break down a bird carcass safely in 5 minutes or less.
- Debone a bird carcass safely in 10 minutes or less.
- Demonstrate knowledge of where different cuts of meat come from on each of the following (beef, pork, rabbit, and goat/lamb)
- Grind 100 pounds of burger meat and sausage meat. A minimum of 20 pounds must be from each type and sourced from an animal raised on the land. (cumulative)
- Separate 100 eggs
- Create a merangue
- Make 3 pounds of butter from milk
- Make 3 pounds of yogurt from milk
- Make 3 pounds of sour cream from milk
- Make 3 pounds of hard cheese from milk
- Make 3 pounds of soft cheese from milk
- Make 3 pounds of pulled cheese from milk.
- Use daikon in at least one meal.
- Demonstrate the proper onion slicing techniques
- Demonstrate familiarity with foundational flavors (Mirepoix, Cajun Holy Trinity, etc)
- Demonstrate knowledge in the different common seasonings, including the different variations of salt.
- Show understanding of the common seasoning pairings (mint with lamb, etc)
- Demonstrate knowledge of 6 cooking techniques (broil, boil, braise, poach, etc)
- Demonstrate understanding of the difference between a boil and a simmer.
- Create 10 gallons each of the following stocks: White, beef, vegetable, fish.
- Create 1 gallon of each of the 5 mother sauces
- Display knowledge of the varieties of flour.
- Create 100 loaves slow developed bread (sourdough) or equivalent mass (600 rolls, etc)
- Create the same amount of standard risen/developed gluten breads
- Create the same amount of batter breads or batter-based food items.
- Create the same amount of unleavended breads.
- Display an understanding of natural and chemical leavening.
- Make 15 pounds of homemade noodles. Dry at least 5 pounds for later use.
- Make 10 batches of kombucha from one scobi
- Incorporate fermented foods into a dish
- Cook 5 meals each using these fresh herbs: Basil, thyme, rosemary, sage, lavender (overlap allowed)
- Create 2 extracts
- Create 5 herb infused oils
- Source at least 50 percent of meals for one year within 100 miles of where you live.
- Create all meals for one year using only seasonal ingredients, dry storage ingredients (beans, flour, pasta, etc) and canned goods that were canned by yourself or someone local.
- Bake 10 different types of pie (I considered part of this requirement being to have at least two of them sent to Paul)
- Demonstrate an understanding of techniques for brining and dry aging
- Render fat into lard for culinary use.
- Make 5 gallons of your own ice cream.
- Cook 3 variations of custard.
- Identify how to determine the freshness of each of the following: Seafood, beef, poultry and pork.
- Brew at least 5 gallons of tea (Any variety, but must be sourced on the land)
- Be able to identify the stages of candymaking (softball, hardball, etc)
- Effectively use the pressure cooker to preserve food

green belt

- Maintain all standards from the previous belt.
- Make an entire meal out of a haybox cooker
- Cook 5 meals with the rocket mass heater smoker
- Demonstrate knowledge of assessing the done-ness of meats without cutting or a thermometer.
- Ferment at least 20 pounds of food.
- Cook 3 meals a day for 20 people for a week.
- Source 90 percent of your ingredients to within 100 miles. Half of this must be within 50 miles.
- Create a 90 day menu around severe dietary restrictions (such as a vegan with allergies to gluten, corn and soy) without repeating the same meal more than twice.
- 50 percent of food used must be organic or better.
- Demonstrate the ability to cook meals that eaters enjoy from a limited selection of items. (10 ingredients for the whole meal aside from herbs and spices.
- Demonstrate the ability to create delicious meals within a limited budget.
- 70 percent of meals made should be made from scratch.
- Butcher a large animal on the land (Cow, pig, etc)


brown belt

- Maintain the standards of the previous belt.
- Create and test 10 completely new recipes (at least one of them a baked good)
- Cook 3 meals a day for 100 people for 1 month (you may use assistants) /or/ cook 3 meals a day for 20 people for one year.


black belt (note that black belt is not required for PEP1 - this is put here for those that wish to pursue a black belt beyond PEP1)

- Maintain the standards of the previous belt.
- Create and test 100 new recipes from all categories of food types and compile them into a cookbook.
- Cook 3 meals a day for 20 people for 2 additional years /or/ serve a banquet of 500 or more using only your own recipes. (you may use assistants)
 
Peter Ellis
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May I suggest that a requirement for a food handler's license be included? If someone is going to be cooking thousands of meals for people, they had better know how to do it safely before they start At least take the course, whether or not a person wants the license is up to them. It has some intrinsic value.
 
D. Logan
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Posts: 584
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Peter Ellis wrote:May I suggest that a requirement for a food handler's license be included? If someone is going to be cooking thousands of meals for people, they had better know how to do it safely before they start At least take the course, whether or not a person wants the license is up to them. It has some intrinsic value.


Not a bad addition. I remember ServSafe being pretty good and not advocating too much in the way of extreme chemical cleaning. Safe food handling should probably be a requirement, though it would require someone who was up to date, but also permie minded to do the training I would think. Some things are still getting taught two different ways depending on where you go for the training (gloves vs no gloves comes to mind).
 
Peter Ellis
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Location: Central New Jersey
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In some respects, I don't care too much what the spin on the training is, because the important piece, imo, is recognizing that there are genuine safety issues and health hazards associated with preparing food. Once you have a grasp of things like not leaving the chicken sitting out at room temperature for three hours, and recognize the potential risks in cross contamination - and when to wear gloves or get out of the kitchen, then exactly how you implement the lessons is where your permieness shines.
 
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