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Difficult low land farming

 
Posts: 308
Location: North Carolina zone 7
8
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Hello friends. I've just cleared an area about the size of a football field to farm. It was seedlings, and brambles. At the bottom there is a creek and it gets ten hours of sun minimum. The problem is that it exists on a power company right of way and I can't just plant what I want. Looking for cash crops that could be left to their own devices once established. The area is completely sealed off and there is little chance of an invasive plant escaping. My mind is open to all thoughts. Thank you.
 
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Posts: 6248
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1011
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First thing I would do is get intouch with the power company, a Right of Way is legally different than an Easement.
The power company actually has all rights to that land, just as if they owned it and you just might find that you are committing criminal trespass.
On the other hand, if you communicate with them, they might allow you to plant on the land.
 
Scott Stiller
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Location: North Carolina zone 7
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So true Bryant. I have permission to farm as long as no permanent structures are built. I am even round up free as long as I keep it tidy and within their guidelines. This is no small task since it's 200 ft wide and three acres.
I'm thinking horseradish, or sunchokes but I'm interested to hear the thoughts of this community.
Thanks for the reply Bryant.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1011
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Glad you are not going to find issues later on down the road.

Horseradish, sunchokes, and probably some grains would do well in an area like that.
Even Daikon Radish could be used to loosen up the soil.
If you wanted to grow some herbs, Echinacea, goldenseal, Althaea Officinalis (marsh mallow) and others would be good additions as well.
 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 308
Location: North Carolina zone 7
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Marsh mallow wasn't on my radar but now it is! Thanks again Bryant!
 
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And I don't know if you're still looking for ideas, but if it's truly low land with regular inundation of water, you might try wasabi. Sounds crazy because it's hard to grow, but it likes wetlands and it's very valuable. May be too sunny though. I liked what Bryant said about using some form of tillage radish if the soil has been compacted, and that got me to thinking about wasabi.
 
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