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Mystery ID of the day: Fungi Addition  RSS feed

 
Landon Sunrich
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This thread will probably be tougher.

So. Growing primarily on 8 inch diameter ornamental blossoming cherry which is being used as the perimeter for raised beds (read full ground contact)

Looks like a wooly mammoth of a turkey tail from above but it has gills that look like and oyster mushroom. I could figure out spore color if that would matter to anyone.
 
John Saltveit
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You have me intrigued, Landon, but unfortunately, I can't give you an answer. I am interested to see what someone else might come up with, though.
John S
PDX OR
 
Ben Gerard
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Hey there!
I seem to have found an answer with the species Lenzites betulina.

Let me know if the images from these websites match.
http://www.sierrapotomac.org/W_Needham/TrametesVersicolor_111223.htm
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/lenzites_betulina.html


I have an excerpt below:
The other Turkey Tail doppelganger is one of the more unusual polypore fungi, the multi-colored gill polypore, Lenzites betulina. Fungi in the family Polyporaceae are commonly known as polypores, as they have many (poly) pores, which are actually the openings for the spore-bearing tubes that extend from the underside of the cap. The multi-colored gill polypore, as the common name suggests, has what appear to be gills on the underside of the cap (like the ubiquitous gilled mushroom). However, the gills are not the same as the true gills of a normal mushroom in that the spore bearing basidia are not connected directly to the sides of the gill surface. Rather the “gills” of L. betulina are in reality a radial arrangement of tubes and pores. Inspection reveals that the “gills” are very tough and leathery, like the polypore to which they adhere. The real Turkey Tail can thus be fairly easily identified in the field. One need only find a polypore with limbate, concentric rings and turn it over. If it has pores, it is a Turkey Tail.

-Ben-
 
Landon Sunrich
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Hey Ben,

Thanks!

Maybe, But I don't know. I'd have to make it fit based on those photos and a quick read through. I am spore printing now. It really really looks like a wooly turkey tail from the top. Like shaggy and shit. It's more white than turkey tails and kinda almost has a pinkish tan to it certain light. The gills are the color of baking honey. Sort of a dirty Carmel. They also get streaked through with a frosty kinda shiny white. They stick around for ever. They've been going the entire cold season.

I'll put up spore print stuff when that happens.
 
Mike Patterson
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Are they hard?
 
Landon Sunrich
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Um, they're rubbery? Less so than Turkey tail a good deal more so than oyster.
 
Landon Sunrich
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White spores.
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