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Where to purchase an Avocado tree in Texas?

 
Posts: 28
Location: College Station, TX Zone 8b
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I have a few reliable places to buy trees online, but none of them will ship me citrus because I live in Texas. Does anyone out there know a vendor with a good selection located in texas?
 
pollinator
Posts: 2389
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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forest garden solar
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These guys ship to you. https://www.fourwindsgrowers.com/index.php

Give them a call to confirm, I don't know anyone who has every used them so don't view this as a recommendation. Do your due diligence.
 
Posts: 249
Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
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Andrea,

I bought my Haas Avocados at Houston Garden Center. The nearest to you is Tomball or Cypress. After September they will have all remaining stock at 50% off if you are not in a hurry. Unfortunately I lost mine to a winter frost (planted near Navasota.) Keep them covered in the winter.
 
Andrea Hooper
Posts: 28
Location: College Station, TX Zone 8b
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Thanks, folks. Home Depot had some 'Fantastic' Avocados that really perked my interest today. I had given up on Avocados here in the Brazos. 'Fantastic' is suppose to be hardy down to 15 degrees, though, so I picked one up and made it to the register... where they wanted $40 for the little thing! Not happening. I'll be looking with much hope down the avenues you have provided!
 
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Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but avocados may not be safe east of the Rockies and Sierra Madre.  Try a pair as "pets" but depend on other things for your income and feeding your family.  Because the US doesn't require wood products and packing to be cooked or otherwise sterilized, many pests are invading from Eurasia (mainly China): Emerald Ash Borer up north, and relevant in this case, an ambrosia beetle spreading Laurel Wilt Disease through the Southeast (first found near Savannah, GA, but has now crossed the Mississippi)  Other than the tall mountains that run down the spine of our continent, and cold weather at some indeterminate line up north that may spare the northernmost sassafras and spicebush plants, I am unaware of any geographic barriers to its spread.  There is nothing to stop it before reaching Texas, and even (eastern) Mexico is likely eventually at risk.  The once ubiquitous red bay (Persea borbonia) is rapidly going functionally extinct (dying before they can reproduce), and the apparently every member of the laurel family is vulnerable to the disease.  (However, Lindera is sometimes spared because its wood is too twiggy to make a satisfying meal for the beetles, and some Asian laurels like camphor may have adaptations to mitigate the damage.)  However avocados are in the same genus as the primary North American hosts/victims (Persea borbonia & palustris) and are neotropical thus naive to the Asian pest.  The are dying in Florida.  Florida is spending a lot of money to learn how to combat this beetle/fungal blight in hopes of saving its own avocado industry, but for now we are losing the battle.  Best of luck.
 
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