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EB Dome - Wall Cabinets?

 
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I have seen a lot of examples/pics of EB kitchen designs with wall cabinets, but they are all round homes/straight walls. What about domes? If the suggested max diameter for a dome is 20', you would lose a lot of space hanging cabinets, since you would need to build out counters and appliances from the walls.
Anyone have examples or alternative storage ideas for a dome kitchen room?

Thanks
Jim
 
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Hi Jim,

I think I should wait for the EB advocates to comment on this subject. I will suggest, this is one of several reasons EB is at the bottom of my "natural building" list of methods compared to others...

As usual with many of these "modern" reinterpretations of a system or concept such as EB, there are ways to "make it work" but your observation about loss of space and challenges in fitting in things like cabinets is very true. Typically it has to be done on an internal flat wall or "keyboards" are embedded in the EB during construction to latter attached cabinets to.

Regards,

j
 
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Jim,
Hanging shelving or upper cabinets in earthbag construction need not be needlessly difficult. Without studs, I'd likely lay up a nailer block and good brick ties in adobe walls. In strawbale, a ground out recess to embed a 1x nailer shot down to a gringo block or slip behind strapping. In earthbag, a gringo block nailer or a cantilevered bracket placed during bagwork or something sharper pounded in after, or furring through bolted, or if a funky spot even a multi layered lathing, or drill and pin, or strapping -- could all be utilized to hang upper cabnitry/shelving/whatever without studs. Or build your shelving/built ins freestanding and pin them into the wall...

As far as kitchen design in a dome: a straight internal kithen/bath/mec wall is nice way to divide space, essentially nooking/bumping/partitioning space depending upon execution... Then you can utilize any old cabintry under a common 8' countertop, with a tub and whatever on the other side... Thats the easy and most practical way--a straight wet wall.

As far as upper cabintry along the dome curve above a kitchen counter, well I assume this would be at the ground floor level where the dome doesn't curve in that much and not up in a dome-ier loft space. So either: trim your old upper cabinet to fit the dome down to 10" instead of 12" so that you can maintain your standard countertop reveal and upper depths if that is important, or nail up that old upper you have unmodified and live with 10" reveal instead of 14", say hell with this curving carpentry and stick an internal wall, or hang shelves down from loft, or nicho out, or don't crowd in too many upper cabinets in order to maximize the feeling of spaciousness and enjoy the beautiful uncluttered aesthetic of dome living. Really, thats not a fair answer; what I'd really like to say is if you just spent a couple billion calories and a few grand building an EB house, why not custom build your upper cabinets shallower to fit so that there is no need to build out counters and lose any space.for my uppers, i milled a branch that looked like the right curve, think i averaged 11" and 9" so their live edges were plumb, in case i wanted to add doors later on. Or maybe the conventional 24" cabinet depth is sized industry standard because it produces minimal manufacturing scrap when cutting 4x8 sheets, but by building your own kitchen, you might enjoy the thought to have 30" deep cabinets for extra storage, extra countertop space and still get to nail up those old uncut upper cabinets. Not too crazy considering considering homesteading needs, common fridge depths, how deep drawered cabinetry storage could replace a pantry, and the 6" of more crap you could now leave on your countertop workspace!
Finishing EB domes and free form out of the box architecture is not the simplist nor does it appeal to most. It has limitations and advantages. EB dome construction avoids Home Depot for many traditional materials top to bottom. For a well crafted kitchen built into the curve, you'll pull out your hair and angle finder more than your speed square or long level.. But maybe the question you should be asking is 'how long will all these dang granite cuts take me'?! The headache of designing and building a good curved wall kitchen is fleeting, whereas cooking at it will last much longer. And while we are talking dome kitchen design, peninsula/islands are nice. In general, I vote for them combined into an L or a yoU (dang javaranch)
I'm rambling now.
Jim, we should really pull Jay to the darkside. Tell him that we got cookies

-EB advocate
 
Jim Grieco
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Haha thanks guys for the feedback. One day Jay will cross over and see the beautiful forest.

After posting this I thought about it more and realized anything on the wall would be custom no matter how you look at it. An island or inside wall would be great however at a 20' max diameter, this does not leave much internal room.

Christopher: I do not want to muddy this topic but I have another post about chicken coops. Since you are an EB advocate if you have anything to say about that couple you post it there?

Thanks
Jim
 
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Christopher did a good job of summing up any idea I had. The only thing I can add is, the additional benifit s of all awkward fixtures being on an inside wall....centrally located heat, cooling, and plumbing. My personal opinion is obviously, the internal central mass, load bearing, straight walled, room division, exhaust point, and etc. If I decide to build round, there's going to be only one multifunction multiple closeted structure in the smack dab middle of the home, dividing the rest of the space with radiant heated walls.
 
Jim Grieco
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Yeah I know. Straight inside walls would solve the problem. However we are building domes and at 20' diameter doesn't give us room for internal walls.
 
chad Christopher
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Build base cabinets with skinny earth bags? Make top cabinets with frame and wire, cover with cob.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=cob+kitchen&go=&qs=n&form=QBIR&pq=cob+kitchen&sc=8-11&sp=-1&sk=#view=detail&id=B1F854E89128F63447D2C6352D561A804844A90F&selectedIndex=3
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Jim, we should really pull Jay to the darkside. Tell him that we got cookies

-EB advocate



That is just EVIL...tempting me with cookies! What's next...pies!...

I am glad to see that my suggestions are the same as others. These methods are used (and have been for hundreds of years) in cob, adobe, and related "free form" wall systems or methods that may not facilitate "flat walls" as well or with good anchor material.

I try to always validate my "bias" about EB (compared to other more traditional/natural modalities) in most cases by explaining my background. By the end of the 1980's (way ahead of any formal knowledge by most of EB) I had already filled 10 of thousands of EB with everything from sand to clay to gravel. I built, lived in, tore apart, thought about, and finally formed some pretty well understood conclusions. When EB advocate Nader Khalili came along, I was interested in this work, and how I cam to some of my own final conclusions. So, not as justification, but "background" my views aren't without some considerable thought and experience.

I think EB has valid applications in some situation...however, in most there are better alternatives...

But I do still like cookies... and will still always try to help with challenges like the one in this post.

Warm Regards,

j
 
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