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Wildflower ID - Dianthus and Bachelor button

 
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Found this morning in Madison County, Arkansas. Thanks for your help!

https://www.facebook.com/DanleyLandFarm
wildflower-1.JPG
Dianthus
Dianthus
wild-3.JPG
Dianathus
Dianathus
wild-2.JPG
Bachelor Button
Bachelor Button
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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The bottom one is chicory I think.....ours isn't blooming yet, but that could be because it is one of my 'chop and drop' plants in the gardens The other two I don't recognize...are they small flowers? There is a kind of 'wild' poppy here that you see in the roadside ditches some places..they are pink, but these don't look like that....maybe you could picture a bit more of the plant and it's leaves?
 
Brendan Danley
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Thanks Judith! They are small and bloom in round clusters. Next time I'm out there, I'll get pics of its leaves too. They are gorgeous, whatever they are!
 
Judith Browning
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Brendan Danley wrote:Thanks Judith! They are small and bloom in round clusters. Next time I'm out there, I'll get pics of its leaves too. They are gorgeous, whatever they are!



I wonder if it could be some kind of dianthus? http://busy-at-home.com/images/garden/dianthus.jpg I have one that is called 'clove pink' ...it has a wonderful clove smell.....the leaves are long and spikey looking like yours but close to the ground and grow almost in a mat and the flowers bud out on single stems. The flower looks similar to some I ran across on line.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=different+varieties+of+dianthus&id=00581ADC27D372C71696F1104D7E36D3ED7491CA&FORM=IQFRBA
 
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The pink ones are some kind of dianthus.

I think the blue one is not chicory but bachelor's button. https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=bachelor%27s%20button%20flower
 
Judith Browning
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Yes, bachelor's button


bachelor's button

chicory flower
 
pollinator
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yep, top one is some kind of dianthus or "pinks" they are sometimes called, the bottom one is blue bachelors buttons, or also called cornflower....

some one may have planted them around there once ago...and they naturalized? or maybe they are just wildflowers out there...
 
Brendan Danley
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You guys rock! I talked to my father and he did plant some annual wildflower mix after my mother passed in 2011. These have reseeded themselves ever since. Thanks again everyone!
 
leila hamaya
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Brendan Danley wrote:You guys rock! I talked to my father and he did plant some annual wildflower mix after my mother passed in 2011. These have reseeded themselves ever since. Thanks again everyone!



yeah these are pretty common in gardens, and "escape cultivation". the dianthus is perennial ? i think? most dianthus are perennials.

the pinks are edible flowers, they are actually pretty good. i think cornflower is edible too.
 
Brendan Danley
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He was probably mistaken when he described it as an "annual" mix. Thanks!
 
You can thank my dental hygienist for my untimely aliveness. So tiny:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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