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Tree Bog w/o the Out House?

 
                                  
Posts: 175
Location: Suwon, South Korea
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After slogging through the tree bog and humanure threads again, I wonder whether those who deposit wastes 'in-house' can still benefit from the tree bog idea. 

Specifically, why wait for humanure compost to mature for a year in the far corner of the yard when it can be used while it's maturing to feed poop-hungry willows, et.al., planted around it?  Okay, not good for edibles, but possibly for other useful vegetation.

And on the issue of humanure compost piles contaminating groundwater during heavy rains, I wonder if by planting a ring of willows, et.al., around the pile, covered or not, whether the plants would benefit from the manure while the manure benefits by having excess water taken up through the root systems instead of being washed away.

We use active compost piles now for producing heat and methane, but maybe we should start thinking of them as nutrient sources as well, while they're maturing.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...i have a weeping willow that i put in our field that is really struggling..i thought it would do well as the water table is high and there is a pond nearby..but nope..it just won't grow.

so hey..maybe i should go over and poop on it
 
                                  
Posts: 175
Location: Suwon, South Korea
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Brenda Groth wrote:
hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...i have a weeping willow that i put in our field that is really struggling..i thought it would do well as the water table is high and there is a pond nearby..but nope..it just won't grow.
so hey..maybe i should go over and poop on it



Ha!  Not a bad idea.  Maybe it'll stop it from weeping. 

 
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
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I've seen photos of compost piles built next to hedges, and it makes all sorts of sense to me. No sense letting the shade & windbreak & leaching nutrients go to waste.

Also, if goats are kept nearby, willow trimmings can go to them, and used bedding material can go back to the compost pile, with less hauling. Thin twigs which goats have stripped of bark might need a little processing to become bedding material, but maybe not much if the pollarding happens frequently enough: some species have a pithy center and might be efficiently crushed in a rolling mill, rather than shredded.
 
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