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kitchen scraps in Humanure system

 
            
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I like adding my kitchen scraps directly to the garden, and I know there has been a lot of agreement on that in this community.  My issue is that I am in the process of switching to all humanure toilets. I think I want all those kitchen scraps in the humanure system.  I am wondering what to do here? 

Paul do you compost humanure?  Does Gaias Garden author?
 
Mother Tree
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Your humanure system will do just fine without the kitchen scraps, it's just a convenient place to put them. 
 
                              
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Kitchen scraps are great in a humanure compost pile, just as in any other compost heap.  You can even add the usual "no-no's" of composting:  meat/animal parts and dairy.

Here's the source for all things humanure: http://www.humanurehandbook.com/manual.html

Btw, from the podcasts and forum posts, I doubt that Paul uses the humanure composting system.  He seems to favor tree bogs.
 
steward
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Who says meat,animal parts and dairy are no-nos in composting?  If it once lived, it is compostable...heck, throw your used Kleenex in the pile.

I know several people who get paid to haul dead animals from the sale barns.  Granted they use piles of sawdust, but they say in 6 months they cannot even find bones from a whole cow or horse in their piles.
 
            
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I have read the Humanure Handbook.  My concern was that the humanure pile needs as much organic matter as possible.  So will it be ok without all of my kitchen compost material.  The pile will have only humanure and maybe the occasional addition of some weeds or whatever.  I love sheet composting I have seen great results.  I think the pile will be fine without kitchen compost.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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My only concern would be that if you are using a lot of sawdust then make sure you don't separate too much urine as the sawdust really does need a bit of help to make it break down and you might not get the poopy bit of the heap hot enough without either pee or plenty of scraps.  But if you're only using sawdust in the buckets and then using straw or hay as a cover material on the heap it should be ok. 

If you invest in a compost thermometer you can check very easily if it's reaching a decent temperature.  If it is, then you have no problems.  If it isn't, it's kind of fun to fiddle around adding more pee, adjusting the moisture level, until you've perfected it. 

Well, I think it's fun.  But then I'm bit odd... 
 
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I personally like to keep veggie scraps for the worm bin.  The worm bin is also the final stage for my humanure composting system.  We poop in 44 gal drums filled with worms, then rotate drums so they sit for at least 3 months, preferably six.  Then I empty out the humanure (after sitting) into the worm bin which finishes it off, and the worms sterilize it.  I only use it on fruits, like trees and maybe winter squash. 
 
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Ryan H wrote:
I have read the Humanure Handbook.  My concern was that the humanure pile needs as much organic matter as possible.  So will it be ok without all of my kitchen compost material.  The pile will have only humanure and maybe the occasional addition of some weeds or whatever.  I love sheet composting I have seen great results.  I think the pile will be fine without kitchen compost.



poo is "green" (high Nitrogen low Carbon and needs "brown" (high carbon low nitrogen) such as straw or sawdust. Kitchen scraps are mostly green.

If you have animals or want compost in less than 2 years you might decide to feed kitchen scraps ormakea quicker compost heap
 
pollinator
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I am putting together a book/dvd/magazine page for Paul, and to save him some time from making a (short paragraph) written review of everything, I figured I'd ask permie folks to write "what Paul would say" in each thread something is talked about.

So what would Paul say about The Humanure Handbook?
 
No. No. No. No. Changed my mind. Wanna come down. To see this tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
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