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Shrub, shrub, what are thee?  RSS feed

 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
22
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You are quite vigorous!
You keep starting new shrubs about you.
You are quite lovely, really, but I'd like to know who you are.

Thanks for any help!
SAM_2235.JPG
[Thumbnail for SAM_2235.JPG]
SAM_2236.JPG
[Thumbnail for SAM_2236.JPG]
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 384
Location: South West France
27
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I'm no expert Vira but it looks like Michaux’s Sumac (Rhus michauxii).

Here's a link to compare : http://www.fws.gov/raleigh/species/es_michauxs_sumac.html

Irene
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1121
Location: northern northern california
67
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i'm also going with some kind of sumac....
 
Dillon Nichols
pollinator
Posts: 597
Location: Victoria BC
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Looks like Elderberry to me, at a glance, though maybe the leaves are too long?

https://gardeninacity.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/2013-07-04-11-56-41-red-elderberry.jpg
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
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Smooth Sumac, Rhus glabra. Michaux’s Sumac doesn't grow that far north unless it's a transplant. The berries turn bright red when ripe and make a really good drink known as Sumac-ade. The berries can be used as a lemony spice. The berries are a very popular spice in Middle-eastern/Mediterranean cuisine. Less well-known are that the bark is medicinal, green new growth twigs are edible when peeled, and the dried leaves are used in herbal smoking blends. A search for sumac-ade and sumac berries will bring up plenty info.
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
22
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This afternoon I noticed that some of the berries seem to be ripening as a dark red.

I'm trying to figure out if I should try eating the berries once they ripen or not!
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
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The outer part of the berries is the edible part. You have to remove the seeds first because they are not edible due to tannins and other substances. If you make Sumac-ade, soak the entire berry stem in cold water, not hot, otherwise tannins will leak into the water. Rub your finger on the berries first before picking them and taste. If it's pleasant, tart and lemony, they are ready. Generally, they are not ready to pick here until late June and early July.
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
22
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Thanks, I'll probably try sumacade once the berries seem ready.
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
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Some people do use the whole seed/berry as a seasoning. They are not poisonous as far as I know. Anyway, there is plenty of info out there about using them. You can also dry and store them for winter use. Sumac is a very useful tree/shrub. They turn bright red in the Autumn too https://www.google.com/search?q=smooth+sumac+autumn&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=VYxrVcuUI4OMsAXct4PwDg&ved=0CB4QsAQ&biw=1280&bih=675

Look for Sumac-ade on youtube for tips.
 
bud smith
Posts: 31
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From the picture it looks like it might be a rowan tree (also called a mountain ash).
If it is, the seeds are similar to elderberry in that they can be somewhat poisonous if they are not prepared properly by heating.
I just thought that I would post this so you can do further research before tasting.
http://www.interference.cc/western-mountain-ash-sorbus-sitchensis/
 
mitch brant
Posts: 70
Location: Western Pa
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Mountain Ash has single rounded flower clusters. Sumac has several outward pointed flower stems jutting out from each upward pointing cluster stem exactly as shown in the first photo. Also, the second photo fits the profile of Sumac perfectly. Otherwise, yes, they look similar.
 
Dillon Nichols
pollinator
Posts: 597
Location: Victoria BC
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Now that I'm seeing this on a non-tiny screen it doesn't look so much like red elderberry...

http://www.eattheweeds.com/sumac-more-than-just-native-lemonade/ Some more info here, though Mitch has hit the high points already; sounds like a nifty find!
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
22
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Thanks for everyone's help.
 
220 hours of permaculture video, freaky cheap! http://kck.st/2q6Ycay.
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