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forest gardening with martin crawford

 
Cassie Langstraat
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Permaculture Magazine is doing a 9 part free film series and this one is the first one!

 
B.E. Ward
Posts: 78
Location: Urburban Western Washington
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I imagine this isn't the most appropriate place for this question, but the video reminded me to ask again..

Are there common techniques for developing firm boundaries around forest gardens? I'm talking about places where you've got a fence (maybe even chain-link) with neighbors on the other side who may not be thrilled about your garden poking into their property. The best I could come up with so far is to establish a path around that perimeter to act as a buffer between the vegetation and the fence. Plantings that trespass that space could be pruned back. Of course, the downside is it leaves a good chunk of space where you otherwise would have been able to plant.

Anyway.. any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
Don Dufresne
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Thanks, Cassie! Good approach to describing what we are looking to accomplish
 
Scott McBride
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Location: Foothills of Cascade Mountains, Snohomish County, WA
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Very excited about this subject and video series. Does anyone have recommendations for books to read about forest gardening?
 
sebastiaan roels
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hi scott

well the guys you saw in the movie is martin Crawford.
I just bought and read his book " creating a forest garden" and I have to say I find it very interesting and complete
lots of concepts explained f ex how wind travels over or around different objects like fences or hedges, touches on the topic of nitrogen fixing plants ad trees
has e pretty good list with all different kinda trees and shrubs. and much much more
I find it a very iformative and beautifull book so I defenetely recommend it !

have a nice day

sebastiaan
 
Dillon Nichols
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B.E., It might not be quite what you mean when you say a firm boundary, but my inclination would be to plant something vigorous and thorny along the fence line, with a path on my side; the neighbour can then benefit from free berries, or free aggravation, whichever way they please. Himalayan blackberry seems a good bet; seabuckthorn might work, but can be somewhat short-lived. Blackberry is rampant around here, and could quite plausibly have just arrived of its own accord...

I'd avoid paths along the fence, a bit of privacy is nice, and a blackberry patch can make a pretty good visual barrier.

I'd avoid planting trees near the line, other than small, short-lived stuff; if the neighbour wishes to hack blackberries back to the property line, no big deal. A big old fruit tree that gets lopped off for leaning over the border would be much more upsetting.

I seem to recall that windbreaks are discussed in Martin's book; he makes a very good case for their inclusion. Right at the edge of the property would be a natural place for this, so hopefully whatever is planted there can also fill this role.
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
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