• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Help to ID this shrub  RSS feed

 
Posts: 299
Location: S. Ontario Canada
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some help to ID this shrub please.
It's from my place in zone 4a. The soil is very alkaline and it seems to be one of the first plants to break into the grassland. After a few years you'll often see another tree (cedar or choke cherry) poking out of the center of the cluster of stalks so it must be doing some important pioneering work.
One pic is early spring, the other is a few months later showing flowers. It's a beast if you let it get away from you and can take over a field in short order but if cut down to the ground the regrowth is so quick it makes a pretty good chop'n'drop plant.




 
Posts: 172
12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That might be ninebark.
 
Roy Hinkley
Posts: 299
Location: S. Ontario Canada
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow.
You just may be right, I did some image searching and the Pacific Ninebark looks pretty darn close even though I'm east of the Great Lakes.
I'll look into the characteristics more as the season progresses.

THANK YOU.
 
pollinator
Posts: 540
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
59
books chicken dog duck food preservation forest garden goat homestead cooking trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't think it is the native Ninebark but a cultivar named Diablo (Physocarpus opulifolius, 'Diablo'). Still native, technically, but altered for color variety -- both leaves and seed heads. The seed head stage has those brilliant red clusters, but the flowers are only pinkish (more white than pink in the "uncomplicated" native variety). Here is a commercial site that has an interesting little page about it. http://georgeweigel.net/plant-of-the-week-profiles/flowering-shrubs/ninebark-diabolo
 
Roy Hinkley
Posts: 299
Location: S. Ontario Canada
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't recall it having the reddish leaves but I'll keep watching this as it changes with the seasons. I would call it invasive where we have it - or at least as alien as the grassy fields we're trying to keep it out of.
 
If you believe you can tell me what to think, I believe I can tell you where to go. Go read this tiny ad!
five days of natural building (wofati and cob) and rocket cooktop oct 8-12, 2018
https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!