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tree id

 
kevin stewart
Posts: 46
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Northeast Arizona, a tough place for anything to grow and yet this tree is doing very well.
Any ideas?

It was planted Southwest of the house to provide shade from the afternoon sun. In the winter it's loses it's leaves and the house gets full sun.

When i drive the width of arizona on the 40 i am constantly amazed at the lack of trees around houses or how they are badly positioned .


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Cris Bessette
gardener
Posts: 764
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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Maybe?

http://www.arizonensis.org/sycamore/nature/flora/alnus_oblongifolia.html


Other trees on this site similar too.
 
Mike Turner
Posts: 302
Location: Upstate SC
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The uneven leaf blade base points to something in the Ulmaceae. Suspect it may be Ulmus parvifolia, a tree which thrives in the Arizona climate.
 
Ryan Crepeau
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Between the rough trunk bark and twig litter it looks like a Siberian Elm to me. I've never heard of one planted on purpose though.

A lot of counties list them as noxious weeds. They are crazy hardy. I've one growing under a power line that I've been cutting to the ground every year for several years and it just keeps coming back. The qualities that make them weeds in some places make the Siberian Elm a great pioneer species in others.
 
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