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Mushroom Identification  RSS feed

 
Posts: 43
Location: Western PA
urban
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Today I received a pleasant surprise when I went out to the compost. I found what looked like a snowball in my tickseed. Besides wondering what this interesting shroom is, I was wondering if there is a good pocket sized book you could recommend? I need a physical copy, not an eBook. Signal in the mountains, not good.

Thanks in advance,
Linda Listing
Western PA
Zone 6
shroom.jpg
[Thumbnail for shroom.jpg]
 
Posts: 79
Location: Minnesota, zone 4, loamy sand
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I am not at all a mushroom experts, but my parents taught me not to touch anything with white cap and annulus around the stem - for the fear of death cap (amanita phalloides), which luckily does not grow in North America - but similarly looking mushrooms may be similarly poisonous.
 
steward
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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It looks like either a lepiota or an amanita of some sort. Either way.. I've found the best guides to be the Audobon Society's field guide for north american mushrooms and the huge tome "Mushrooms Demystified" by David Arora. Both books have a good ID key and a lot of color photos to compare your finds to.

 
Posts: 129
Location: Elgin, IL
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David Arora has a good pocket field guild as well. Check out "All The Rain Promises And More".
 
Posts: 127
Location: Orgyen, zone 8
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If there is a sac at the base, you might have a member of the Amanita bisporigera group (AKA the Destroying Angel):

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_bisporigera.html

The books by Gary Lincoff (Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms and The Complete Mushroom Hunter) are great books for beginners who live in the eastern United States.

 
Linda Listing
Posts: 43
Location: Western PA
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It does have a sack or bulbous base. I took all your words to heart and handled it with rubber gloves. Mushrooms and fungi are a new world to me with all the various tree limbs decomposing around the yard. I put in a check terrace because the yard is steep. I shall definitely order a copy from my independent bookseller. Thank you so much!

Linda Listing
Western PA
Zone 6
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[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
Destroying Angel
 
The moustache of a titan! The ad of a flea:
Permaculture Design Course in Divinya - a yogic community in Sweden
https://permies.com/t/106159/permaculture-design/Permaculture-Design-Divinya-yogic-community
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