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Which grass should I be growing to mulch

 
Joe McCrohon
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Hi folks, the community garden I'm working on gets very wet in winter but also rather dry in summer, I was therefore thinking that a grass that likes wet conditions could be grown in winter and then used as a mulch in summer when things are drier but which grass should I use? for reference I live in the south of England. Also it would help if it was reasonably fast growing.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Look into some of the fescues, many of these will tolerate wet feet fairly well and when summer comes you actually won't have to turn them under.

You should also be able to find information locally on the old native grasses which did well in your area and those too would be easy choices as well as keep things "Naturalistic".
 
Adriaan van Roosmalen
Posts: 25
Location: Netherlands (moderate maritime climate)
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You could sow winter rye (Secale cereale). According to the cultivation detail section at http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Secale+cereale it can grow in areas with rain from 22 to 176 cm annual.

Most clovers like moist sol, and they fix nitrogen. Here in the Netherlands I can sow crimson clover up to September as a biennial. For the other clovers that I have experience with (white and red) it is to late in the season.
 
Cristo Balete
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Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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Not sure what zone you are in, but I have had real struggles with perennial grasses where there is no serious winter kill. They can spread and invade, especially in a community garden where everyone has to be taken into consideration, and the future of what grows there will have to be taken care of by people who didn't plant it, or removed by others. So setting future people up for a lot of labor is one of those issues.

A thick pea/bean/clover ground cover makes great mulch, improves the soil, is mowable and the beneficial insects love them. They reseed where they aren't walked on, and with careful scattered additional plantings, they can continue until winter. In mild winter areas the clovers do really well.

It's not a good idea to use burr clover where dogs and cats are, because the burrs can give them really problems when they get in their ears and noses.

 
Ken W Wilson
Posts: 384
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I used to use oats. Bought a 50lb bag at a feed store cheap. Germination was still good after 3 years. I quit using it because it keeps the ground too wet in the spring. It'd probably work good to use it on the part of your garden that doesn't need to be planted early.
 
D. Klaer
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Location: Queensland Australia
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Here vetiver is the obvious answer. It might survive there?
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
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