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Regarding Oaks  RSS feed

 
Posts: 66
Location: Nova Scotia
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Last question, for now.

Does anyone have experience growing oaks yielding sweet acorns? That is, acorns with little enough tannin to be edible raw.

I am looking at the selection available here: http://www.nuttrees.com/hybrid.htm

and am trying to choose a variety. I am looking for a large tree form oak. The conditions are dry, sandy and full sun with little soil. Red oaks do very well nearby but their acorns taste horrible, no matter how many I try  I'm too lazy to spend the time processing them and I figure planting a single sweet oak would save a lot of effort.

I would consider a chestnut too, there's no blight in our area (yet).

Comments? Suggestions?
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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have never tried the sweet oaks but have planted several white oaks from acorns and they grew well and quite fast (they aren't as fast as others but well worth growing in your lifetime if you are fairly young, started mine in the 70's).
 
Joshua Msika
Posts: 66
Location: Nova Scotia
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I was just using the term "sweet oak" to designate any oak with sweet acorns. That's most of the white oaks and some cultivated red oaks.

Have you tried the acorns from your oaks? You crack the outside shell (really easy, I do it with my teeth with no worries) and there's nutmeat inside. Since they are white oaks, you might get lucky; I've read that edibility varies considerably from one individual tree to the nest. Tannins make the acorns bitter so you can wash the bitterness out but I'm looking for some with naturally low tannin.
 
steward
Posts: 3410
Location: woodland, washington
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I don't have experience with oaks: the one seedling I planted is years from producing acorns.  but I do have a bit of experience with chestnuts.  unfortunately, the chestnuts I've got are far older than I am, so I don't have a lot of cultural advice for starting from scratch.  they like well drained dirt.
 
Posts: 258
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Oak leaves are toxic for some animals  so think out where you want to plant them with that in mind if you are going to ever have a mixed use.
 
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